Bike Sharing in the USA

Give them easy access to a bicycle and they will ride? That’s what the new company B-cycle is hoping. Starting this week, in coordination with Earth Day, the collaboration between TREK, health-care company HUMANA, and ad agency Crispin Porter + Bogusky, will enable folks in Denver to rent bikes for trips around the city.

The cost varies. Membership is required and can be obtained online or at a bike kiosk ($5 for 24 hours; $65 annual; $30 for 30 days). (Other rates include $1.10 for a one-hour pedal, and $6.60 for two-hour rides.)

But a cool bonus: If you need a B-Cycle for 30 minutes or less, it is free!

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B-Cycle Station in Denver

B-cycle’s pitch is pretty good. “Imagine a bike that is always ready to ride, where and when you want to ride it. The tires are always inflated and the chain is never rusty,” says the website. “A bike with a basket to carry your knapsack. A bike with front and rear lights and a bell that fits people tall and short. A bike that’s there whenever you need it, and gone when you don’t.”

“That’s a B-cycle,” the text continues. “And it’s powered by the ultimate alternative fuel: You.”

Want B-cycle in your city? The company is hosting a vote on its website to help determine future cities where they’ll set up shop. Austin, Texas, is currently leading with more than 2,000 votes.

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B-Cycle bike

Hopefully, this will get non-pedaling folks to realize urban riding can be the quickest way around the city.It’s healthy and fun, too. A major part of this battle is providing bikes in good working order at an affordable price, which B-Cycle is doing. But what do you think Gear Junkie readers? Will companies like B-Cycle help lure city dwellers away from public transit or their cars?

—Stephen Krcmar

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