Good coffee in the Great Outdoors

I reviewed Java Juice about a year ago in this column. Now, the company, a Los Angeles brewer (www.javajuiceextract.com), has two new flavors and a decaf variety.

Java Juice contains 100 mg. of caffeine per packet, which is the equivalent of two shots of espresso. It’s organic and kosher.

Like the original plain-coffee flavor, the new French Vanilla and Hazelnut flavors contain the same 100 mg. of caffeine per packet, which is the equivalent of two shots of espresso. The decaf kind is called Swiss Water Decaf Java Juice.

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With these packets, which are pure coffee extract, making a cup of java involves nothing more than pouring a packet into 8 to 16 ounces of water—depending on how strong you like it—and then letting the dark and heavy fluid do its thing. In about 10 seconds, the drink is ready for consumption.

As I said in the original review, Java Juice works equally well in hot or cold water, though it can taste bitter if added to boiling water. Its beans, which are shade-grown and certified organic, are sourced from fair trade farms, according to the company. It has a one-year shelf life.

Packets cost about $1.50 each. They weigh almost nothing and are tear and puncture resistant. I tried but could not burst one by pressing it hard between my two hands.

Brewing up a good cup of coffee in the outdoors often requires a French press or a portable—but always bulky—camp-stove-compatible espresso maker. But with Java Juice packets, the process is distilled to its utmost simplicity: Pour in a packet of extract, and drink. . .

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