Bike 'Appliances' Can Make Coffee, Generate Electricity, Wash Your Clothes…

It’s generally frowned upon to multitask while biking. But bike-powered appliances are one exception.

From washing clothes to brewing coffee, there are few daily chores that can’t be accomplished by bicycle power. Here are a few of our favorite bikes that double as appliances.

Photo (right) by Justin Steiner/Dirt Rag

Lawn Mower — If cutting the lawn is cutting into your time on the saddle, this bicycle-powered lawn mower could be your answer. The Mow Cycle is a heavy-duty recumbent tricycle with a reel mower attached to the bottom. It was created by New Hampshire bicycle-builder Ted Wojcik and his son Cody, a mechanical engineer. While this bike isn’t in full production, you can contact Wojcik for an estimate.

Smoothie Maker — The only thing healthier than drinking a smoothie, is drinking a smoothie that you made with your own two legs! The Fender Blender is a $1,700 stationary bike with a blender attached to the front. The faster you pedal, the faster it blends, plain and simple.

Espresso Machine — There’s a definite overlap between riding bikes and drinking good coffee. The Velopresso is a bike that takes this trend to a whole new level. The three-wheeled bike uses a Gate’s carbon belt drive to power the drivetrain as well as a coffee grinder. Five seconds of pedaling will grind enough coffee for a double shot…three if you’ve been training.

Alternative Workspace — For many cyclists, biking to work is a no-brainer. But how about biking at work? The Big Rig is a $2,000 workstation created by New York-based brand Pedal Power. It can run anything from an air compressor to small shop tools through direct mechanical linkages. (See our full coverage of the Big Rig product here.)

Washing Machine — More biking usually means more dirty clothes… unless the bike you’re riding is also your washing machine! The aptly-named Bike Washing Machine is a conceptual design made by students of the Dalian Nationalities University. Each pedal stroke causes the drum of the machine to rotate. Any extra electricity generated can be stored for future use.

While it is an interesting concept, I’d probably rather just turn on my washing machine and head outside for a ride. —Amy Oberbroeckling

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Amy Oberbroeckling, an Iowa native, joined GearJunkie out of college and brought a passion for endurance sports as well as a flawless record in arm wrestling matches against famous rock climbers. Find her biking, trail running, cross-country skiing, camping, or tipping back a cold IPA.
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