Klymit Klymaloft Sleeping Pad
The top of the Klymaloft air pad reveals its unique hybrid structure; photo credit: Sean McCoy

First Look: ‘Klymaloft’ Sleeping Pad Combines Foam, Air for Cushy Sleep

Klymit combines some of the best features of foam and air sleeping pads for a unique hybrid mattress called Klymaloft.

Air mattresses provide an excellent buffer against hard, rough earth. But air chambers aren’t the softest or coziest thing against the skin. So Klymit designed an innovative new sleeping pad aimed at giving campers the best of both worlds.

In short: The Klymaloft sleeping pad offers a lot of comfort in a welterweight package. Most suitable for car camping, the Klymaloft sleeping pad could stretch into occasional backpacking and horse- or ATV-assisted backcountry use. It weighs 38.5 ounces, packs down to 11.5 x 8 inches, and has an ASTM R-value of 2.1.

Klymaloft Sleeping Pad Review

One glimpse at the Klymaloft sleeping pad ($150), and you’ll know it’s not like other sleeping pads. The hybrid design is very apparent, with a plush foam topper covering two-thirds of the pad’s top. The bottom third has no topper — just air tubes where your lower legs rest.

The concept is that the foam topper conforms to support the body and eliminate pressure points while underlying I-beam air chambers create loft and stabilize the sleeping pad. The design also helps strike a balance between comfort, pack size, and weight.

Klymit Klymaloft Sleeping Pad
The bottom of the Klymaloft pad looks like a typical air mattress; photo credit: Sean McCoy

For complete transparency, this is a very early first look, and due to COVID-19, I haven’t yet taken this pad into the field for a good overnight camping experience. I’ll update the story with more in-depth review material once I have a chance to do so.

In a few nice naps on the Klymaloft, I did find it very comfortable. The foam is soft under the weight of my upper body. And where my legs dangle off the foam, the air tubes provide plenty of support.

As a side sleeper, I found adjusting the pad to a middle firmness allowed me to find comfort on my side while still supporting me off the ground entirely.

The topper fabric is very soft and quiet. And overall, the pad is pretty quiet when you shuffle around on it. But it’s definitely not silent and does create a few crinkles when you shift around.

Inflation and Deflation

It took me about 20 deep breaths to inflate the Klymaloft. It’s a thick pad, so that was no surprise. For most people, this equates to a couple of minutes to inflate it if you don’t want a massive head rush.

But thanks to the one-way valve for inflation, it’s easy to give it a few good breaths and then take a short break. The valve worked great to inflate the pad.

Klymaloft sleeping pad

The valve is pretty interesting. You spin it inward to quickly deflate the pad. You can then spin it to the “deflate” position, which prevents air from re-entering the pad as you roll it up.

Klymit Klymaloft Sleeping Pad

Rolling the pad is pretty easy: Fold it in half lengthwise, press out most of the air, and roll. Doing it quickly resulted in a snug fit in the provided stuff sack. I suspect taking a little more time to cautiously get all the air out of the pad would make the fit easier.

Overall, this is a comfortable sleeping pad very well-suited for car camping in warm-to-cool weather. It’s definitely on the heavy side for backpacking but does pack small enough for occasional hiking trips. It would work great for backcountry hunting trips supported by ATV or horseback.

Klymit Klymaloft Sleeping Pad

With an R-value of 2.1, it provides little insulation, so don’t plan to use it when the temps fall below about 40 degrees Fahrenheit.

At $150, it falls into the middle range of comfort-oriented sleeping pads. So for those looking for a nice, soft place to lie down and rest in campgrounds (and maybe a bit beyond) this summer, the Klymaloft is a worthy contender.

Sean McCoy
By

Editor-in-Chief Sean McCoy is a life-long outdoorsman who grew up hunting and fishing central Wisconsin forests and lakes. He joined GearJunkie after a 10-year stint as a newspaperman in the Caribbean, where he learned sailing and wooden-boat repair. Based in GearJunkie's Denver office, McCoy is an avid trail runner, camper, hunter, angler, mountain biker, skier, and beer tester.

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