Adventure

Follow off-the-grid excursions, ultra races, mountain climbs, expeditions… and all things “adventure” around the globe.

Q-and-A with The Gear Junkie

In this tell-all Q&A interview, Stephen Regenold (a.k.a. The Gear Junkie) talks with author Bill Katovsky about cycling 135 miles on snow, "existential realignment" via ultra-endurance athletics, and watching a friend rag-doll over talus on a particularly horrid ski biff in the backcountry north of Bozeman, Montana. . . Read More...

November 1, 2007

Beer Run

The Hash House Harriers are a drinking club with a running problem. That's according to a man known as Bob-Shiggy-Bob, who I met last month while on assignment to cover the strange international phenomenon of hashing, an athletic drinking game of sorts involving ad hoc urban courses, clues chalked on sidewalks, hidden coolers of beer, and grown men running wild while dressed in bunny suits. Read More...

September 19, 2007

What does it take to run Badwater?

The bitter pill that is the sport of ultramarathon -- footraces of 50 miles or more -- is unusually hard to swallow in Death Valley National Park, where each July the Badwater Ultramarathon attracts 85 men and women to run 135 miles through the desert sands and to the mountains beyond. What does it take to run the Badwater? Ask Blake Benke, a 30-year-old athlete and ex-Marine from New York City who finished in eighth place during this year's event. This story is a profile of his race. . . Read More...

August 16, 2007

Foot Care for the Ultra Crowd

In endurance sports like adventure racing and ultra running, keeping your feet happy and healthy for hours or days on the go has always been difficult. Lord knows I've learned the hard way. This story outlines a few tried-and-true foot strategies I've employed for keeping things feeling good and functional down there in the land of blisters and chafe. . . Read More...

July 25, 2007

Meet Dr. Feet

Diagnosing the likes of plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, stress fractures, and shin splints, Dr. Paul Langer is a podiatrist as well as a running expert. As a runner, Langer has two dozen marathons, several triathlons and the Ironman under his belt. As a doc, he treats patients based on medical knowledge as well as his personal familiarity with the human body in motion. This is my profile. Read More...

June 27, 2007

Mount Shasta Report

Can you say crap storm? I just got back from Mount Shasta, and I have a good story to tell. Winds reached 100mph on top, and an estimated 80mph where we camped. A large avalanche slid less than a quarter mile from our camp. Our tent survived, though other climbers' shelters did not: poles snapped, nylon ripped, some tents literally blew away, gear flying down the mountainside. Read More...

May 9, 2007

Company Profile — Mandatory Gear

This is my profile of Mandatory Gear, a Minneapolis company that makes some of the lightest-weight backpacking and adventure racing gear available. Indeed, the company's Puppy Pile tent is touted as the lightest freestanding, four-person tent ever made, registering on the scale at a mere 1 pound 9 ounces. Read More...

May 7, 2007

“K2,” The Play

"K2" is a play by Patrick Meyers that opened earlier this month at the Jungle Theater in Minneapolis. Written nearly three decades ago, K2 has seen runs around the world, including Broadway. A 1992 motion picture of the same name is loosely based on Meyers' play. This is my review of the performance, focusing on the philosophical/existential dialogue as much as the high Himalayan drama. Read More...

April 13, 2007

Q-and-A with The Gear Junkie

Rail Riders recently interviewed The Gear Junkie, and here's the full Q&A, complete with ramblings on existential exhaustion, emotional breakdown and enlightenment. Questions in the interview range from discussions on outdoors sports to my opinion on ways to treat waterborne parasites. Oh, and there's a bit about gear in there somewhere as well. Read More...

April 2, 2007

The Mike Curiak Syndrome

Mike is back, and things did not go quite as planned, though he put up a courageous effort. As reported by Craig Medred in the Anchorage Daily News, Curiak ran into 30-below-zero weather combined with 70 mph winds. Read More...

March 28, 2007

Cold Consequences

In a story this weekend for the Minneapolis Star Tribune, I write about David Heitkamp of New Haven, Ind., who competed in the Arrowhead 135 Ultramarathon last month, and—as this image shows—did not fare so well. These are medical photos taken a few days after the race ended. This year’s Arrowhead race started in International […] Read More...

March 15, 2007

Mountains To Climb Before You Die

In a recent story for Forbes, I polled Ed Viesturs, Jack Tackle, Will Gadd, and four additional star alpinists to create a list that highlights the world’s greatest mountain ranges. The choices—ranging from Washington State’s Cascades to the Karakoram of Pakistan—represent these climbers’ personal favorite mountain ranges, inspired by memories of epic ascents, three-month-long expeditions, […] Read More...

March 4, 2007

North America’s Toughest Ski Runs

A long time ago, as a burgeoning ski bum in the early 1990s, I kept a scribbled list in a notebook of some of North America’s most difficult double-diamond runs, from archetypes like Corbet’s Couloir at Jackson Hole, to Snowbird’s Great Scott in Utah, and the Palisades at Squaw Valley, Calif. My goal was simple: […] Read More...

February 27, 2007

Self Reliance Defined (on a bike in Alaska)

I honestly thought the Iditarod Trail Invitational (the new name for Iditabike) self supported. That’s right. No drop bags. No outside help. He’ll haul all his own food and supplies. . . in a trailer. So, let me repeat this: Mike Curiak will ride a bike 1,100 miles THROUGH THE SNOW, for up to 20 […] Read More...

February 8, 2007

Highpointing — Silva, Maptech, Mountaineers Books

Each of the 50 U.S. states has a high point of elevation, be it a towering mountain peak or a nondescript knoll in a cornfield. To a small group of climbers who call themselves highpointers, every one of these summits is geographically significant. Read More...

March 17, 2004
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