Adventure

Follow off-the-grid excursions, ultra races, mountain climbs, expeditions… and all things “adventure” around the globe.

The World’s Weirdest Footraces

A 5K for nudists, an Antarctic marathon, and a race that cumulates at a giant pit of mud round out my Top 10 picks for the oddest footraces on the planet. One event here features -- no joke -- paramilitary obstacles and electrically-charged whips. If you're into this type of gig, this story is your guide. . . Read More...

March 30, 2008

International Adventure Girl — Bria Schurke

Bria Schurke, a 22-year-old woman from Ely, Minn., has led a life straight from the pages of National Geographic. As the first-born child of explorer Paul Schurke, Bria went to the North Pole in first grade and picked through mammoth bones on Russia's Wrangel Island while still in junior high. Oh, and she's now an ultra racer as well. This is my profile of Bria's life so far, dog sleds, Greenlandic pack ice, raw seal meat, and all. . . Read More...

March 20, 2008

Norway Ski Trip — Report #3

This final trip report about my Norwegian escape last week is photo-heavy, with Kvitfjellet and Smorbottentin, two magnificent mountains of the Romsdal Alps, grabbing most of the limelight. The skiers -- skinning up, summiting the mountains, and then (some) dropping knees to burn perfect tele turns -- don't hurt either. Makes me want to get back on that plane and do this trip all over again. . . Read More...

March 18, 2008

Norway Ski Trip — Report #2

Last week while on a ski-touring trip to Norway's Romsdal Alps I sailed the long and narrow seas of a fjord. This is the second post in a three-part report on my trip, where we "sailed" (powered by a 250hp Volvo diesel) a ship called the Anne Margrethe to ports like Andalsnes and Eresfjord, hulking mountains towering above, icy water below sloshing by. . . Read More...

March 17, 2008

Trip Report — Skiing Mt. Ogden’s Banana Chute

Last weekend, after two days at the Outdoor Retailer trade show in Salt Lake City, I snuck off into the mountains to try out some new ski gear on a big descent. Indeed, at more than 5,000 vertical feet, the Banana Chute off the west side of Mt. Ogden is among the largest sustained ski descents in the region. . . Read More...

January 29, 2008

GoldSprints

Goldsprint racing is a rising offseason cycling activity that melds a stationary bike trainer with a video game. Riders pedal to move wheels on a computer-connected roller system, transferring power output to its virtual equivalent onscreen, where an animated biker ticks along. I tried this strange -- and physically taxing -- activity last month while on assignment for the local newspaper in Minneapolis . . . Read More...

December 21, 2007

Andy Knapp — Survivor

Can perseverance and fortitude forged from a lifetime in the outdoors boost your strength in other parts of life? For Andy Knapp, a 60-year-old retail buyer at Midwest Mountaineering in Minneapolis, the answer is a big Yes. For the past five years Knapp -- a lifelong adventurer -- has fought kidney cancer, and he's tried to approach the sickness with the same type of strategy he'd apply to a tough mountain climb: Each painful therapy, each new experimental drug is a pitch to scale on a steep face. Kick one foot into the snow, rest, breathe, then step up and kick again. . . Read More...

December 12, 2007

Fitness in the Blood

What on earth is a blood lactate threshold? I had no idea before last week, when I got on a treadmill to undergo a fitness test. But knowing your blood lactate threshold -- a point where lactic acid floods muscle cells too fast for the body to metabolize the excess -- can help trainers prescribe personalized fitness regimens that maximize your time outdoors (or indoors) running, biking, hiking, etc., in preparation for that next big event. . . Read More...

November 8, 2007

Q-and-A with The Gear Junkie

In this tell-all Q&A interview, Stephen Regenold (a.k.a. The Gear Junkie) talks with author Bill Katovsky about cycling 135 miles on snow, "existential realignment" via ultra-endurance athletics, and watching a friend rag-doll over talus on a particularly horrid ski biff in the backcountry north of Bozeman, Montana. . . Read More...

November 1, 2007

Beer Run

The Hash House Harriers are a drinking club with a running problem. That's according to a man known as Bob-Shiggy-Bob, who I met last month while on assignment to cover the strange international phenomenon of hashing, an athletic drinking game of sorts involving ad hoc urban courses, clues chalked on sidewalks, hidden coolers of beer, and grown men running wild while dressed in bunny suits. Read More...

September 19, 2007

What does it take to run Badwater?

The bitter pill that is the sport of ultramarathon -- footraces of 50 miles or more -- is unusually hard to swallow in Death Valley National Park, where each July the Badwater Ultramarathon attracts 85 men and women to run 135 miles through the desert sands and to the mountains beyond. What does it take to run the Badwater? Ask Blake Benke, a 30-year-old athlete and ex-Marine from New York City who finished in eighth place during this year's event. This story is a profile of his race. . . Read More...

August 16, 2007

Foot Care for the Ultra Crowd

In endurance sports like adventure racing and ultra running, keeping your feet happy and healthy for hours or days on the go has always been difficult. Lord knows I've learned the hard way. This story outlines a few tried-and-true foot strategies I've employed for keeping things feeling good and functional down there in the land of blisters and chafe. . . Read More...

July 25, 2007

Meet Dr. Feet

Diagnosing the likes of plantar fasciitis, Achilles tendonitis, stress fractures, and shin splints, Dr. Paul Langer is a podiatrist as well as a running expert. As a runner, Langer has two dozen marathons, several triathlons and the Ironman under his belt. As a doc, he treats patients based on medical knowledge as well as his personal familiarity with the human body in motion. This is my profile. Read More...

June 27, 2007

Mount Shasta Report

Can you say crap storm? I just got back from Mount Shasta, and I have a good story to tell. Winds reached 100mph on top, and an estimated 80mph where we camped. A large avalanche slid less than a quarter mile from our camp. Our tent survived, though other climbers' shelters did not: poles snapped, nylon ripped, some tents literally blew away, gear flying down the mountainside. Read More...

May 9, 2007
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