SOS rescue by Alaska State Troopers

Stranded in Alaskan Winter, Exoskeleton Marathoner: Adventure News of the Week

From the inspiring to the tragic, ‘Adventure News of the Week’ presents a wrap-up of top news in the world of exploration and adventure.

SURVIVAL: Man Survives for 3 Weeks in Alaska With No Shelter. Tyson Steele was living in a remote cabin north of Anchorage when it caught fire, leaving him stranded in freezing temperatures.

To survive, Steele was crafty: He built a snow tent, then a basic shelter out of the debris, and drew messages in the snow with ash. State troopers rescued him via helicopter after 3 weeks.

AVI: Inbounds Avalanche Kills 3 at Idaho Ski Resort. A sudden inbounds avalanche at Silver Mountain Resort in Idaho resulted in the deaths of three people.

Rescuers found two bodies after the initial search and one later, after another skier was reported missing. Search-and-rescue and local volunteers recovered all survivors and fatalities from the mountain. The resort has since reopened.

RECORD: South Carolina Man Sets Record for Exoskeleton Marathon. Adam Gorlitsky became paralyzed after a car crash in 2005 and has since become an advocate for adaptive mobility.

This Saturday, he ran the Charleston Marathon in 33 hours, 50 minutes, 24 seconds. Unlike most para-athletes, Gorlitsky didn’t compete in a wheelchair, but rather in a robotic exoskeleton called ReWalk, which allowed him to walk and run on his own legs.

Gorlitsky set a new Guinness World Record, beating the previous one by over 2 hours.

SLED: Blind Sled Dog Runs 100 Miles. An Alaskan husky named Indy just ran 100 miles, which is impressive considering he runs without the use of his sight.

Indy, who has been retraining as a sled dog, pulled on a team with his canine friend Popcorn in the 100-mile race in Cook County, Minnesota. He’s training for a 300-mile sled dog marathon later this month.

PLANE: The 1st All-Electric Plane Completes Successful Flight. Quiet planes sound pretty inviting, so a Canadian company set out to make one.

Harbour Air modified one of its seaplanes with an electric motor to convert the plane to all-electric power. The plane’s first test flight in Vancouver lasted about 5 minutes.

Mary Murphy
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Mary is based out of GearJunkie's Denver, CO office. Her outdoor interests span from climbing to landscape photography to pack-paddleboarding. If she's not writing, you can most likely find her at the top of a fourteener, or in a local bakery.

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