14 Skis And Boards Manufactured In USA

A proliferation of made-in-America skis and snowboards in recent years has led to coalition building among 14 brands that manufacture rides right here in the USA. Still small and growing, the Ride American Made Skis & Snowboard Colab companies pool their resources and advertising dollars to compete against larger brands that manufacture overseas. For consumers who care where their dollars go and want to support U.S. manufacturing, these brands are an easy alternative choice. Here are 14 of our favorite new models from the bunch. —Sean McCoy

See page 2 for snowboards

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Batalla – All Mtn Twins

Batalla – All Mtn Twins (On sale for $519.99)
Built at the Epic Planks factory in Grand Rapids, Michigan, Batalla’s all mountain skis are designed for riders who want to spin off pow kickers and ride forward or backward. They have a lot of taper and thus a short effective edge and tight turning radius.
Type: Directional twin
Features: Tip/tail rocker, camber underfoot, poplar core with maple stringers, sintered die-cut base, poured urethane side walls
Specs: 134-106-130 @ 177 cm; Radius 15.9m

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Bluehouse – Maestro

Bluehouse – Maestro ($904 retail; on sale now for $499)
Bluehouse Skis began in 2007 and has since grown into a production factory in Salt Lake City. The brand sells direct to consumer. The Maestro is a full-rocker ski for flotation on soft snow and chopping through crud. Bluehouse claims the skis are fine on the groomers and can hold an edge. The Maestro has been a staple in the Bluehouse lineup since its inception and continues to inspire skiers with its imaginative graphics and playful vibe.
Type: Full rocker
Features: Carbon reinforced vertically laminated poplar core
Specs: 134-118-131; 20m radius @ 189 cm

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Fat-ypus – D’Riddum

Fat-ypus – 2014 D’Riddum ($790)
The new 5-point ski design from Fat-ypus is a quick-turning ski because of its shortened edge contact length. The versatile nature of this rockered powder ski allows it to be used on less-than-blower days.
Type: Powder
Features: Rockwell 48 steel edges, p-tex sidewall, vertical laminate poplar wood core, Durasurf sintered base, Die-cut graphics
Specs: 134/143/118/138/129

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High Society – Powchickawowwow

High Society – Powchickawowwow ($720)
Built in the Never Summer snowboard factory in Denver, this Aspen-based brand has been designing skis since 2003. The Powchichawowwow is a big mountain blaster with a 122mm-under-foot-print. It is available in a full rocker and an early-rise tip. It was awarded an Editor’s Pick from Freeskier Magazine two years in a row.
Type: Big mountain ski
Features: Poplar wood core, rubber foil dampening system, p-tex sidewalls, die-cut sintered base, carbon fiber stringers, tri-axle fiberglass
Specs: 150-122-140 @ 185 cm; Radius 26.4 m

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Icelantic – Shaman SKNY

Icelantic – Shaman SKNY ($749)
Denver-based Icelantic has built quite a following with its Never Summer factory produced planks, and it is one of the better known USA-made brands. The new SKNY series was developed for on-piste fun, shrinking the width of four popular models. The Shaman SKNY has the same flex and sidecut radius as the regular Shaman, just skinnier. It has a diamond-shape shovel for floatation and torsional rigidity and a tapered design for hardpack days.
Type: Traditional camber carving
Features: Poplar wood cores
Specs: 140-90-110, Radius 15m @ 173 cm

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Meier Skis – The Doc

Meier Skis – The Doc ($790)
Meier Skis began in 2009 in a one-car garage. We had a chance to test this ski and loved it (check out my review from last winter). Meier Skis are now made in Glenwood Springs, Colorado, using locally sourced wood including poplar and beetle-killed pine. The Doc is a steep-mountain, aggressive ski with minimal camber and early-rise tip and tails
Type: All Mountain
Features: Poplar and pine cores
Specs: 140-108-133, 21m @ 180cm

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Montana Ski Company – The Soldier

Montana Ski Company – The Soldier ($795 semi-custom)
An all mountain, versatile ski with blunt nose twin tips, trapezoidal wood sidewalls and a wood core, The Soldier will get you anywhere on the mountain. The Montana Ski Company builds its skis in Whitefish, Montana.
Type: All mountain semi-custom
Features: Varies
Specs:126-87-110 @ 172 cm

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Ramp – Peacepipe

Ramp – Peacepipe 2014 ($719)
The Ramp Peacepipe is designed for charging big open slopes, powder, windblown hard patches, and even speedy groomers. It has early-rise tips with camber underfoot and a fat but curvy profile for versatility. Made in Utah, Ramp uses many U.S. sourced materials.
Type: All mountain
Features: Bamboo cores, customizable sidecut, Kevlar laminate, pine-based U.S. sourced resin, Crown Plastic sintered base
Specs: 146-112-134 at 179cm

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Rocky Mountain Underground – The Apostle

Rocky Mountain Underground – The Apostle ($799)
Made in the Never Summer factory in Denver, the Rocky Mountain Underground Apostle is designed for variable snow conditions and sidecountry charging. The Apostle is a light 5-point ski weighing in at just 7.8 pounds. RMU is based in Breckenridge, Colo., where the skis get extensive testing in Summit County mountains.
Type: All Mountain/Backcountry
Features: Tip rocker with camber underfoot, Military-grade UHMW sidewalls, sintered bases, poplar core
Specs: Five-point – 126-132-105-120-114 Radius 17.3 @ 185 cm

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Voile – V8

Voile – V8 ($625)
No, it’s not a French company. Voile makes 98 percent of its gear in Salt Lake City, including splitboards, skis, tele bindings, and avalanche shovels. The light Voile V8 ski has a wide shovel tip and narrow tail for float in powder. A tight sidecut radius and shortened running length make it playful and easy to control.
Type: Backcountry
Features: Light and fat at 7lbs 5 oz (176cm), rockered tip with camber underfoot, carbon-wood laminate
Specs: 141-112-123 at 176cm with 17.3 radius

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Wagner Custom Skis

Wagner Custom Skis In Queensland Walnut ($2,050)
Wagner Custom builds skis in a wind and sun powered factory near Telluride, Colo. Its skis are high-end with prices to match. Choose from many designs, plus extra features such as impact resistance, carbon torsion box construction, World Cup bases, and metal construction (all add to the price). The Queensland Walnut is sure pretty, a quarter-sawn dark brown hardwood with close, medium grain and wavy figure. Custom designed length, width, sidecut, camber, overall stiffness, and flex pattern.
Type: Full custom skis
Features: Vertical sidewall construction, clear grained, all-wood core for lively feel, responsiveness, and durability; oversized steel edges and extra thick bases for longevity
Specs: Vary

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4FRNT – CRJ

4FRNT CRJ ($699)
The 4FRNT CRJ is the late CR Johnson’s signature ski. The company calls it playful, fun, and poppy. With a camber-and-rocker design and moderate sidecut it should perform well in varied conditions from powder to hardpack. Proceeds from this limited-edition ski benefit the High Fives Foundation, a non-profit dedicated to helping people who have suffered life-altering injuries.
Type: All mountain
Features: Camber with rockered tips
Specs: 122-112-120 at 180cm

See page 2 for snowboards…

Posted by SLC - 10/23/2013 07:44 PM

It’s Icelantic, not Icelandic. Also, given the fact that you highlight three skis made in the Never Summer factory, shouldn’t a Never Summer snowboard be here?

Posted by Editor - 10/23/2013 09:28 PM

SLC, while Never Summer is not part of the 14-brand collaboration their contribution to the industry is certainly huge. We added a bonus board from the Never Summer lineup. Thanks for pointing out the omission as well as the erroneous spelling.

Posted by Mike - 10/24/2013 07:42 AM

What about GNU & lib-tech?

Posted by Editor - 10/24/2013 09:52 AM

Both are great companies Mike, but not part of the Collab. This is by no means meant to be a complete list of US ski and board manufacturers. Nice to see the interest and we’ll research their products for future stories. What others would you like to see covered?

Posted by CascadeConcrete - 10/24/2013 12:50 PM

This list is pretty much a tragedy. You named 3 that contract to Never Summer, so they don’t actually make their own ski’s. One(Battala) that is in their first year as a company, and they don’t make their own ski’s. In this case you should have at least featured Epic Planks instead. 4Frnt while being a pretty rad company only makes one model(not the CRJ) in SLC. Their ski’s are made by Elan in Slovenia.
You should have gone out of your way to feature brands like Moment, ON3P, and Praxis to say the least.
In the last most you mention something about the “Collab”. What are the “Collab” requirements. And how does one become part of it. Is there a fee?
I guess this is not meant to be a list of all companies, but sad to see the omission of 3 companies that are killing it, and much more relevant than some of the included ones.
I would guess, being part of the “collab” requires a fee.
So, pretty weak list.

Posted by Editor - 10/24/2013 03:33 PM

CascadeConcrete, thanks for your input. The “Collab” is not of our creation. It is a group of 14 manufacturers that have teamed up to pool funds for marketing and advertising efforts. And yes, that takes money. In following the formation of the group, we learned that they reached out to most US manufacturers. Some were interested and some were not. We thought it was a creative solution to for small brands to compete with much larger corporations and worthy of our attention. We are sorry you disagree. Moment, ON3P and Praxis are all on our radar for reviews, previews and other stories as the ski season takes off.

Posted by Editor - 10/24/2013 04:05 PM

This is what the Collaboration has to say about itself, directly from their website (which is linked at the top of the story):

“In putting the Made in USA campaign together, we worked hard to recruit every company we could find in the U.S. that make skis and snowboards here. We reached out to 25 different companies, some extremely small and of course the larger ones. The companies you see represented in the campaign are the ones that were willing to sign on, contribute financially, and try to help raise the awareness of the Made in U.S.A. ski and snowboard manufacturing renaissance. We of course realize not every brand is listed here, but it’s not for lack of trying. And we respect every company’s situation. There was a lot of debate. For example, does the company have to make everything here or a portion of its product here? You can find many points of view. We felt that if a company is making a significant portion of its product here, creating jobs, and growing the amount it produces here, then that makes sense. One of our goals was to raise enough money to have a campaign. We did the best job we could recruiting the USA companies and bringing awareness to this fantastic growing business.”

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