Sleep With The Polar Bears In Canada's Subarctic 'Rolling Lodge'

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The Great White Bear Tundra Lodge; photo by Colin McNulty/Natural Habitat Adventures

If you’ve ever wanted to sleep with a bear you’re in luck. Welcome to one of the world’s most specialized hotels.

The Great White Bear Tundra Lodge, located on the subarctic tundra outside the small Canadian town of Churchill, Manitoba, is a custom “rolling hotel.”

Each year, it is moved to an area of high polar bear density for easy bear watching.

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Bears wander near the Great White Bear Tundra Lodge; photo by Brad Josephs/Natural Habitat Adventures

This custom “train” of connected bedrooms, dining room and lounge car is built on wheels, allowing it to be stationed for optimal bear viewing each season. Tour operator Natural Habitat Adventures offers 32 rooms in the lodge, each with a single compartment similar to sleeping quarters on a train with either an upper or lower berth.

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Photographing polar bears from the lodge; photo by Alek Komarnitsky/Natural Habitat Adventures

The lodge has six shared toilets, four showers, a lounge area for viewing bears and a dining car with sliding windows for viewing and photography.

Natural Habitat Adventures, which is a partner of the World Wildlife Fund, also has “rovers” that can shuttle guests from the lodge in safety.

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A bear gets personal with a rover; photo by Henry Holdsworth/Natural Habitat Adventures

If the idea of a luxurious visit to polar bear country gets you excited, pull out your wallet — a six day, all-inclusive trip including air travel from Winnipeg to Churchill will cost $5,595.

Make plans well in advance. You’ve got plenty of time until next bear viewing season, which runs from October through November. —Sean McCoy

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Bears chill under the Great White Bear Tundra Lodge; photo by Glen Delman/Natural Habitat Adventures

Posted by Shawn - 12/21/2013 10:22 PM

What does this rolling hotel do to Polar Bear breeding and how does it change it’s food sources and such? Has whether or not it’s good for a species in trouble been established yet? You can see a polar pear at the zoo that’s already been affected by the presence of a daily passing of humans in it’s habitat. Do we really need this?

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