Oakley Prescription Glasses

Despite a dependency on corrective lenses, I’d never considered sports-oriented prescription glasses to be germane for the active genre of outdoor sports I favor. When people mentioned “performance” eyewear, the one thing that came to mind were the thick-framed plastic goggles seemingly favored by high-school wrestling teams.

In reality, eyewear companies have been developing high-quality, durable and sleek prescription glasses for quite a long time. Oakley’s Half Jacket, for example, is the company’s best-selling sunglasses model, and it’s available with just about any kind of lens prescription.

Oakley-HalfJacketW.jpg

Oakley offers two lens shapes and 18 lens hues for its prescription Half Jacket glasses. You pick the clear, amber or dark lens that will best accommodate the anticipated conditions.

The lenses are removable and interchangeable, meaning you can buy multiple lenses for varying environments or swap them out for non-prescription lenses when you want to wear contacts.

I put a Half Jacket pair to the test mountain biking and orienteering over the course of a month. Initially, the glasses were overwhelming to my eyes and were uncomfortable to wear for more than 20 minutes. Oakley actually warns about this in the Half Jacket’s literature, saying that its optics provide an unusually wide field of vision and enhanced peripheral clarity that may require a period of adaptation.

It took me four or five days to get used to the glasses, but now they are sharp, clear and comfortable for long periods.

Design-wise, the Half Jacket is a solid model that seems to glue to your head. Even after a couple hours of running through the woods on a tough orienteering course, the glasses remained comfortable. I climbed over logs, thrashed through thorns and trudged in swamp muck up to my knees, but the glasses never fell off and barely even slipped on my sweaty face.

Prescription glasses are never remarkably affordable, and the Half Jacket follows suit with prices that start around $300. To purchase the glasses, you must work with an Oakley-affiliated eye doctor who can take your prescription and order the frame and lenses from Oakley. The company provides a dealer locator section on its Web site to guide you to affiliated doctors near your home.

Price: frame only, $130; prescription lenses range from $165 – $245 a pair.
Contact: Oakley Inc., 1-877-619-0312, http://www.oakley.com.

Posted by GlobalEye - 01/08/2010 10:43 AM

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Posted by kaur - 01/25/2010 06:08 AM

Nice information regarding prescription glasses.

Posted by will - 08/06/2010 11:00 PM

so , i just bought a pair of Oakley Spike Titaniums and i dont know where to buy my lenses or how much they will be..i got the glasses of ebay..?

Posted by Arthurp - 08/13/2010 08:54 AM

I just picked up my Oakley Radar Path prescription sunglasses. Prior to purchasing them I did as much research on-line as possible. I expected a corrective lens to be part of the overall lens. When I tried on the demo pair at the optician there was a line on the demo lens showing what part of the lens would be the prescription area. What nobody tells you is the prescription is nothing more than two thin applications glued to not only the inside of the lens, but the outside as well. In my opinion it looks ridiculous! I also own a pair of Maui Jim prescription sunglasses. The entire lens is custom made for the prescription, not just a cheap application.I paid $465 for the Oakleies. I didn’t get what I thought I was getting. I don’t blame anyone for my misjudgment, but for $465 I expected a real custom made lens. Only time will tell how they will hold up, but I would not recommend Oakley to anyone seeking custom made prescription sunglasses. I like the style and that’s why I bought them. Unfortunately there is no custom quality workmanship involved for my $465.

Posted by Phil Hughes - 11/04/2010 03:32 AM

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Posted by Jones - 10/29/2011 05:14 AM

I ordered two Half Jackets with rx prescription lenses at an optician and prior before ordering I tried them on. I chose the Half Jacket because of its fit. However, when I picked them up I was very disappointed. It seemd that the prescription lenses don’t fit the frame AT ALL. The prescription lenses gets squeezed into the frame which results in a completely different fit. When you take out the lenses, the frame shoots back into its original model. No wonder some people are complaining about hairline cracks that appear over time in the frame. The frame is under massive tension because of these prescription lenses. I would like to mention that I ordered my Half Jackets at an official Oakley dealer and that the lenses come from Oakleys suppaduppa lab in Ireland. For some reason, I couldn’t find this issue on internet but I feel that future buyers need to be warned. I left my pair at the optician, a colleague is going to look at it on Monday but he allready told me that the frame can’t be adjusted so they have to see of they can do something about the lenses. I’m not very hopefull but I’ll keep you posted

Posted by Summer - 05/10/2013 08:57 PM

If you got the real Oakley lenses they will have the “o” logo on the bottom left of the left lense. If its not there then it’s not Oakley lenses and… Well…there prolly crappy.
You have to buy the Rx glasses at an authorized Oakley optometrist or on their website.
I’m a huge fan of the functionality of their lenses. They are hands down the best and longest lasting Rx glasses I have ever had. Worth every penny to me.
I ride MX, mt bike, and trail run.

Posted by Summer - 05/10/2013 08:59 PM

If you got the real Oakley lenses they will have the “o” logo on the bottom left of the left lense. If its not there then it’s not Oakley lenses and… Well…their prolly crappy.
You have to buy the Rx glasses at an authorized Oakley optometrist or on their website.
I’m a huge fan of the functionality of their lenses. They are hands down the best and longest lasting Rx glasses I have ever had. Worth every penny to me.
I ride MX, mt bike, and trail run.

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