Petzl climbing rope recall

Petzl Rope Recall: Brand Asks Consumers to Check for Defect

More than 15,000 Petzl ropes intended primarily for rope access work, caving, canyoning, and other activities have been recalled due to a risk of failure, and possible injury.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission today issued a voluntary recall, performed by Petzl, of its Low-Stretch Kernmantle Ropes. According to the notice, the ropes “can have a deep cut or tape securing the ropes together,” potentially leading to a break and fall or injury hazard.

Petzl posted a notice to consumers in July to check certain models of their low-stretch kernmantle ropes. Before today’s recall, the brand said it only received one report of the defect, which it traced to a defect in one of its rope-cutting machines.

The faults, initially reported by a consumer after purchasing new Petzl AXIS 11mm ropes, include a deep cut in one segment of rope and a “2.1-meter scrap of rope taped to one end.”

Petzl has now moved to a full recall of about 14,850 ropes sold in the U.S., and another 2,500 sold in Canada. According to the recall, the ropes were designed for a range of applications and activities, including technical rescue, industrial applications, climbing, caving, mountaineering, and more.

Full details on the affected ropes are below.

Petzl Rope Recall

Petzl rope recall
Recalled ropes will have taped ends (left) or a deep cut (right); photo credit: Petzl

Consumers should first stop using their low-stretch kernmantle rope and inspect it for the defects. Again, this includes any deep cuts or ends taped together. Petzl recommends users refer to this procedure to properly inspect the ropes.

Petzl also identified the issue impacts only ropes with serial numbers ranging between 18 C 0000000 000 and 20 H 0000000 000. These ropes have a nylon core and polyester sheath material.

Consumers with the following serial numbers should fully inspect and, if necessary, contact Petzl for a free replacement rope (serial numbers are located on the label at the end of each rope):

  • Axis 11mm rope (white, yellow, black, blue, red, and orange) available in 150, 200, 600, and 1,200 feet; model numbers R074AA00 – R074AA27
  • Parallel 10.5mm (white, yellow, black, blue, red, and orange) available in 50, 100, 200, and 500 meters; model numbers R077AA03 – R077AA28
  • Vector 12.5mm rope (white, yellow, black, blue, red, and orange) available in 150, 200, 600, and 1,200 feet; model numbers R078AA00 – R078AA27
  • Segment 8 mm (white) available in 50, 100 or 200 meters; model numbers R076AA00 – R076AA06
  • Ray 12 mm (yellow/black) available in 25, 50, 75, 100, and 200 feet; model numbers R091AA00 – R091AA04
  • ASAP’AXIS 11 mm (white) available 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 meters; model numbers R074DA00 – R074DA05
  • Push 200 9 mm (white, orange) available in 200 meters; model numbers R40AW200 and R40AO200
  • Club 200 10 mm (white, orange) available in 200 meters; model numbers R39AW200 and R39AO200
  • Top 9.8 mm (not sold in North America)
  • Lead 9.8mm (not sold in North America)
  • JAG Rescue Kit model numbers K090AA00-K090AA02

More Information

Petzl noted the faulty ropes retailed at GME Supply, Karst Sports, and industrial and recreational stores nationwide, as well as online from March 2018 through July 2020, and sold for $200-1,200.

The brand said it has remedied the manufacturing problem and that it did not extend back before March 2018. Petzl also said that while both the cut and the taped ends share the same root cause, “the risk of the two defects occurring is near zero — only a complex sequence of multiple, independent factors could lead to the occurrence of the defects.”

Anyone who finds a defect, owns a rope included in the recall, or has further questions should contact Petzl at 1-877-807-3805 or email safetynotices@petzl.com. Find more information online here.

Adam Ruggiero
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Adam Ruggiero is an all-sport activity junkie - from biking, running, and (not enough) surfing, to ball sports, camping, and cattle farming. If it's outside, it's worth doing. Adam graduated from the University of Minnesota with a BA in journalism. Likes: unique beer, dogs, stories. Like nots: neckties, escalators, manicured lawns.

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