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The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Keep your eyes comfortable on the road with these top driving sunglasses.

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There’s nothing better than flying down the road on a clear, sunny day, feeling the engine hum, and bobbing your head to your favorite tunes. But there’s no worse feeling than squinting into the sun while you do it, struggling to see clearly through the relentless glare.

A good pair of driving sunglasses leaves you free to enjoy your drive and experience the nuance of your vehicle’s handling and response without any distraction or discomfort from the sun. Nearly as important, the best driving sunglasses also go a long way in upping your cool factor. What do iconic Hollywood driving scenes have in common? Sunglasses.

After years of ongoing on-the-road testing, we compiled this list of the best driving sunglasses on the market. At the end of our list, be sure to check out our comprehensive buyer’s guide as well as our comparison chart. And if you have some questions, take a look at our list of frequently asked questions.

Editor’s Note: We updated this Guide on May 14, 2024, with the addition of the Smith Redding Chromapop Glass and the Tifosi Swick Polarized, two of our new top picks.

The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Best Overall Sporty Driving Sunglasses

Smith Redding Chromapop Glass

Specs

  • Best for Wraparound coverage in all conditions
  • Lens material Glass
  • Frame Size Medium
  • Lens Shape Square
  • Polarized Yes
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Excellent optics and color accuracy
  • Wraparound style provides great peripheral coverage
  • Close, comfortable fit

Cons

  • Close fit can cause fogging during active use

Best Budget Driving Sunglasses

Tifosi Swick Polarized

Specs

  • Best for Active use, all-around wear
  • Lens material Polycarbonate
  • Frame Size Medium/Large
  • Lens Shape Square
  • Polarized Yes
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Affordable price
  • Comfortable fit
  • Good coverage and protection

Cons

  • Sportier style might not suit everyone
Best Aviator-Style Driving Sunglasses

Ray-Ban Classic Aviator

Specs

  • Best for Classic aesthetics, great peripheral vision
  • Lens material Crystal
  • Frame Size Medium
  • Lens Shape Aviator
  • Polarized No
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Sleek classic appearance
  • Durable lenses
  • Plentiful peripheral vision, minimal bind spots

Cons

  • Lacks peripheral coverage
  • Not all lens styles are polarized
Best Over-Frame Driving Sunglasses

Fiore Over Glasses Sunglasses

Specs

  • Best for Wearing over prescription glasses
  • Lens material Plastic
  • Frame Size Medium
  • Lens Shape Wrap around rectangle
  • Polarized Yes
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Compatible with most prescription glasses
  • Cuts glare

Cons

  • Slightly bulky
Best Driving Sunglasses for Extreme Glare

Oakley Holbrook Mix

Specs

  • Best for Driving on bright summer days
  • Lens material Plastic
  • Frame Size Medium
  • Lens Shape Rectangle
  • Polarized Yes
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Impressive contrast enhancement
  • Durable frame
  • Handsome styling

Cons

  • Expensive for plastic lenses
Most Stylish Driving Sunglasses

Persol Steve McQueen

Specs

  • Best for All-day comfort, timeless style
  • Lens material Acetate
  • Frame Size Small/medium
  • Lens Shape Round/teardrop
  • Polarized No
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Stylish
  • Quality materials

Cons

  • Expensive for non-polarized glasses
Best of the Rest

Maho Sundance

Specs

  • Best for Long road trips, overcast conditions
  • Lens material Polycarbonate
  • Frame Size Medium/large
  • Lens Shape Aviator
  • Polarized Yes
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Good value
  • Filters out glare
  • Versatile

Cons

  • Like many polarized styles, these glasses make LCD screens difficult to read
Best of the Rest

RAEN Pierce

Specs

  • Best for Bright conditions, larger face shapes
  • Lens material CR-39 (glass-like resin)
  • Frame Size Large
  • Lens Shape Square
  • Polarized No
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Great fit for larger faces
  • Effective on sunny days
  • Durable hinges

Cons

  • Not polarized

Merry’s Polarized Aluminum Sunglasses

Specs

  • Best for Folks on a budget
  • Lens material Nylon
  • Frame Size Medium
  • Lens Shape Square
  • Polarized  Yes
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Affordable price
  • Included case
  • Good value for polarized lenses

Cons

  • Not the most durable

Legere Round

Specs

  • Best for All-day wear, rugged use
  • Lens material Polycarbonate
  • Frame Size Medium
  • Lens Shape Round
  • Polarized No
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Durable

Cons

  • Not polarized
  • Some glare issues

American Optical Original Pilot

Specs

  • Best for Everyday wear, classic aviator looks
  • Lens material AOLite Nylon
  • Frame size Medium
  • Lens shape Aviator
  • Polarized No
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Comfortable
  • Minimalist design

Cons

  • Not polarized

Maui Jim Wiki Wiki

Specs

  • Best for Fans of the classic wire frame look
  • Lens material Composite
  • Frame Size Medium
  • Lens Shape Rectangle
  • Polarized Yes
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Stylish
  • Quality materials

Cons

  • Expensive for non-polarized glasses

Ray-Ban Clubmaster Square

Specs

  • Best for Fans of the classic ’50s Clubmaster look
  • Lens material Crystal
  • Frame Size Small/medium
  • Lens Shape Round
  • Polarized Yes
The Best Driving Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Unisex style
  • Quality materials
  • Clear optics

Cons

  • Retro style isn’t for everyone

Best Driving Sunglasses Comparison Chart

SunglassesPriceLens MaterialFrame SizeLens ShapePolarized
Smith Redding Chromapop Glass$275GlassMediumSquareYes
Tifosi Swick Polarized$60PolycarbonateMedium/LargeSquareYes
Ray-Ban Classic Aviator$230CrystalMediumAviatorYes
Fiore Over Glasses$17PlasticMediumWrap-around RectangleYes
Oakley Holbrook $270PlasticMediumRectangleYes
Persol Steve McQueen$482AcetateSmall/MediumRound/TeardropNo
Maho Sundance$195PolycarbonateMedium/LargeAviatorYes
RAEN Pierce$185Glass-like resinLargeSquareNo
Merry’s Aluminum Sunglasses$30NylonMediumSquareYes
Legere Round$110PolycarbonateMediumRoundNo
Americal Optical Original Pilot$194OLite NylonMediumAviatorNo
Maui Jim Wiki Wiki$319CompositeRectangleRectangleYes
Ray-Ban Clubmaster$230CrystalSmall/MediumRoundYes
We tested the best driving sunglasses in a variety of styles, shapes, and lens colors; (photo/GearJunkie)

How We Tested the Best Driving Sunglasses

Our team of testers has been carefully scrutinizing the sunglasses market for years. Great sunglasses are great sunglasses, but we recognize that certain characteristics are extra important while driving. To develop our list of recommendations, we drove in all sorts of conditions, from glare-heavy late afternoon sun to overcast mornings.

In our latest 2024 update, year-round Tahoe resident Nick Bruckbauer added a few new pairs of shades to this review, drawing on his experience driving in the high-altitude sunshine and reflective snow around Lake Tahoe, and from road-tripping between the west coast and his family in the midwest.

While testing, we consider frame and lens quality, overall durability, glare control, peripheral vision, comfort, and style. All of the sunglasses on this list stood out from the pack. As new styles hit the market, we’ll be sure to test and consider them for this list. At any given time, our recommendations include the best of the best.

Buyer’s Guide: How to Choose the Best Driving Sunglasses

Eye Protection

Too much sunlight can cause permanent damage to our eyes. Just like skin, eyes need to be protected from the sun’s UV rays. A good pair of sunglasses will keep your eyes safe and comfortable on and off the road.

Driving Safety

In bright conditions, sunglasses can help us see the road ahead with clarity and accuracy. Without sunglasses, our ability to perceive depth and distance can be severely impaired, especially in the early morning or late afternoon light.

Comfort

Accurate vision and eye protection aside, driving in the bright sun is just plain uncomfortable. Without driving sunglasses, prolonged squinting can lead to nagging headaches.

What to Look for When Purchasing the Best Driving Sunglasses

The best pair of driving sunglasses is the one that lets you drive most safely and comfortably; (photo/Nick Bruckbauer)

Your go-to driving sunglasses should elevate your experience behind the wheel. When it comes time to select the best pair for you, there are several important factors to consider. In this buyer’s guide, we will go over the primary benefits of the best driving sunglasses and thoroughly explain what you should consider before making a purchase. Don’t settle for anything less than the perfect pair of driving sunglasses.

Type of Frame

Frame Size & Shape

Before purchasing a pair of the best driving sunglasses, it is wise to make sure they are well-fitted and comfortable. Different frame sizes and shapes work better for different people. You will want a frame that will not cause discomfort or require constant adjustment.

Some common frame types to check out include wayfarers, aviators, circular, rectangular, shield, and rimless. If you’re unsure what size or type of frame fits your face best, go try on some shades in person to start narrowing down your options.

Frame Type & Coverage

Glasses with wider frames and taller lens designs will provide more coverage and protection. Remember that sunlight can also enter your eyes from the side while you are driving, and it may be wise to choose a pair of glasses that provides added protection from all angles.

We really like the wraparound style of the Smith Redding sunglasses, which helps prevent sunlight or glare from hitting the sides of your eyes; (photo/Nick Bruckbauer)

Frame Material

While frame material comes down to personal preference, you should be aware that some materials are more flexible and durable than others. Most driving sunglasses feature a frame made out of acetate or nylon. Both materials are lightweight and are able to hold their shape even in extreme conditions. Metal frames are common, too, though they tend to offer less wraparound protection.

Type of Lens

Polarized Lenses

A good-quality pair of driving sunglasses should have polarized lenses. When harsh sunlight reflects off surfaces, including tail lights, puddles, and stop signs, the resulting glare can be temporarily blinding. Polarized lenses can block some of this intense reflected light and make driving safer and more comfortable. Some of our favorite lenses are the ChromaPop lenses from Smith Optics.

Drivers should be aware that polarized lenses can also make it difficult to see some digital dashboard displays. Before purchasing, test the sunglasses against your dash display to make sure you can still read the displays.

Gradient Lenses

Gradient lenses are lighter at the bottom and darker toward the top. While driving, the darker part of gradient lenses can block sunlight, while the lighter portion of the lens will still allow you to see your dashboard and the road clearly.

Transitions Lenses

Transition lenses are able to change from clear to dark depending on the light conditions. Because these lenses rely on direct UV light to work, they probably aren’t the best choice for driving, as your car’s windshield filters out some of the sun’s UV light. Still, there are some great driving sunglasses with transition lenses.

spy aviators
Different lens designs and tints can impact how you see the road and your dashboard instruments; (photo/GearJunkie)

Lens Material

Most sunglasses lenses are made from polycarbonate or glass. Glass tends to offer the best optical clarity and is also harder and more scratch-resistant. While polycarbonate lenses are not as durable, they are more lightweight and less likely to break upon impact.

Durability

The durability of a pair of sunglasses depends on materials, craftsmanship, and weight. In general, glass lenses are more scratch-resistant, while polycarbonate lenses are less likely to shatter under impact.

Acetate and nylon frames strike a good balance between hardiness and flexibility. When you aren’t wearing your glasses, keep them protected in a place where they will not be scratched or damaged.

Price

The price of a pair of driving sunglasses can vary from under $50 to well over $400. Many cheaper pairs will not be polarized or provide adequate UV protection. More expensive sunglasses may include higher-quality materials and lens technology. We always recommend making your selection based on comfort and performance rather than price.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best pair of driving sunglasses?

That depends. The best pair of driving sunglasses are the ones that offer the kind of comfort and performance that you prefer. We endorse all of the glasses on this list, and we always recommend that you try a few different options before purchasing. Our favorite classic-looking shades are the Maho Sundance and our favorite sportier-looking model is the Smith Redding.

Should I wear sunglasses while driving?

Driving with sunglasses during the daytime helps you see the road ahead and prevents your eyes from becoming fatigued. We always recommend at least having a pair of sunglasses available in the car in case you need them.

What color lenses should I get?

Most drivers prefer a neutral-colored lens that is either grey or copper-toned. Neutral lenses enhance your vision without altering the colors that you see. Depending on the light conditions, you may want lighter or darker lenses to filter the appropriate amount of light.

Do polarized lenses eliminate glare?

Polarized sunglasses can reduce harsh glare and reflected light. In bright or highly reflective conditions, many drivers successfully use polarized sunglasses to lessen the effects of glare and block harmful UV rays.


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