Porsche 911 Rooftop Tent
(Photo/Porsche)

Porsche Goes Glamping: Iconic Automaker Launches Rooftop Tent

Porsche builds a 911 rooftop tent so you can spend more time on your favorite roads and less time finding a hotel.

Can’t decide between camping and driving your sports car on the weekend? Porsche says you don’t have to. Pick the new hardshell rooftop tent designed to fit the latest generation Porsche 911 and you can have your drive and sleep on it too.

Porsche enthusiasts have been doing the rooftop tent thing for years now. Usually, they’re on SUVs like the Cayenne, or maybe a Panamera Cross Turismo, but every once in a while all-out sports cars like the 911. Now, Porsche has decided that there is a big enough market to offer their own RTT.

If you’re sticking a tent on the roof of your Porsche, it needs to be light. At 123 pounds, the Porsche Tequipment roof tent isn’t a feather, but it’s not bad for the category — especially since it’s got a hard top for optimal aerodynamics. Sadly it is only rated to 81 mph — a whole lot slower than many drive their Porsches.

Porsche Tequipment Rooftop Tent

Porsche 911 Rooftop Tent
(Photo/Porsche)

Folded, the tent measures 4 feet 9.5 inches wide and 4 feet 7 inches long. It’s just over a foot tall when stowed. Unfolded, the floor is suddenly just an inch shy of 7 feet long and is 4 feet 3 inches wide. So, even though it might be on the top of the small Porsche, it has room for just about anyone.

If you install it on a 911, the maximum weight capacity for the tent is 309 pounds. Installed on a Cayenne SUV (Porsche actually labels the fit-guide vehicles with a roof rack and vehicles without), it can hold 419 pounds. These are stationary numbers, not on the move.

Easy-Up Rooftop Tent Design

Porsche 911 Rooftop Tent
(Photo/Porsche)

For quick tent setup, the tent comes with a pair of gas pressure shocks. Just like the front trunk, the struts help push the hard shell case open. Four poles keep the tent held taut, making sure it doesn’t decide it wants to close before you’re ready to head out.

The telescoping ladder is integrated into the tent frame. Porsche knows you don’t have much cargo space, so it has integrated most of the key components and even some of the accessories — like the polyfoam mattress that’s built in, and a separate rain cover for the entryway.

Porsche made the walls from a breathable cotton blend, with water-resistant zippers and an insulated quilted lining. The windows open for ventilation, they also have zippable bug mesh and blackout panels. On the underside, where it overhangs the car, Porsche has added a system of hooks to hold gear to dry, or just keep off the ground.

Porsche RTT: Fits Most 911 Models

Porsche 911 Rooftop Tent
(Photo/Porsche)

The tent will fit most Porsche 911 models, though it won’t work if you have a Porsche GT car (like the GT3), a cabriolet, or a Targa. The same tent will fit on the Taycan, Cayenne, and Macan, should you decide you need to bring more gear next time.

Porsche plans more accessories through its Tequipment line. These will include an inner tent for even more insulation, a heated blanket for cool nights, and organizers for shoes and bags.

The tent will be offered in black and gray, and it will be on sale in the U.S. starting in November of this year. We’re still waiting for an American price from Porsche, but at €4,185 in Europe before taxes, we expect it to come in around $4,200 here.

While you’re scrolling through the Tequipement options list, we’d suggest some all-weather floor mats and the custom luggage set to help complement your Porsche camping setup.

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Evan Williams
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Evan has been drooling over cars since the time he learned to walk. Since then he's worked on controlling the drooling and expanded his interests to include hiking, cycling, and kayaking. He went to school for engineering but transitioned into a more satisfying career and has been writing automotive and outdoors news for nearly a decade