Eddie Bauer's Adaptative Ski Kit

Eddie Bauer Unveils First Ski Kit Made Specifically for Adaptive Skiers

Unique articulation, thoughtfully placed seams, and extra insulation where it’s needed most are just some of the innovations behind the Eddie Bauer BC Flyline Adaptive Ski Kit.

Designed with Trevor Kennison, the first adaptive skier to hit X Games 15-foot big air with a 70-foot gap — and the first adaptive athlete to participate in Jackson Hole’s Kings and Queens of Corbet’s — Eddie Bauer’s sit ski-specific BC Flyline jacket and bib employ greater articulation.

This unique design specifically targets comfort when sitting down.

“Our mission as a brand is to get as many people from diverse walks of life into the outdoors as we can,” Eddie Bauer president Damien Huang said.

“On one hand, it’s a big brand initiative. On the other hand, it’s the design team responding to meeting with an athlete whose needs weren’t being met.”

Eddie Bauer BC Flyline Adaptive Ski Kit

Eddie Bauer's Adaptative Ski Kit -

Many aspects of the kit are those you’d find in any great ski jacket and bib. Eddie Bauer imbued the waterproof material with stretch and packed it with synthetic insulation to help remain warm when wet. The jacket has oversized chest pockets and insulated hand pockets.

Additionally, the BC Flyline kit has a drawstring at the back of the collar to keep snow out. The bibs carry extra insulation in the butt, hips, and back of legs. The silhouette is heavily shaped to reduce bunchy, excess fabric when the skier is seated. Buckles on the shoulder straps adjust for the skier’s torso length.

The bibs have three-way zipper entry, with a center front opening from the top of the bib and center zippers for access to lower parts of the bib.

Plus, the bibs’ articulation matches the shape of a sit-ski bucket with no seams on the back. The slightly tapered bib cuffs pair with a low-profile winter boot. And an insulated interior gaiter works to keep snow out while keeping the skier’s ankles warm.

A heavily articulated stretch panel at the back of the bibs’ knees allow a skier’s legs to fully extended. And the bibs have increased back coverage, with the back fabric wrapping over the shoulders. This provides more insulation and comfort as well as prevents the straps from sliding off the skier’s shoulders.

Eddie Bauer's Adaptative Ski Kit

No Financial Expectations

“I’m proud they dedicated so much time to it; that’s been super well-received,” Huang said. “And I have no idea if there’s a market. We don’t have a financial expectation. It was an effort to help a guide, and to get individuals who have suffered paralysis into the outdoors.”

Huang says that making the sit ski-specific kit is similar to the brand’s work in extended sizes and its work on a genderless fit paradigm.

“From a range of body representation in model casting, to how customers shop extended sizes on its site, the brand wants to ensure all people can see themselves outside in our apparel,” he said.

Trevor Kennison - Eddie Bauer's Adaptative Ski Kit

Huang says the brand isn’t doing it for future high returns. He believes Eddie Bauer’s plus-size and adaptive offerings are going to be less profitable than the rest of its line.

To begin, Eddie Bauer will have 100 kits in this first run. As for what’s after that, Huang said, “We won’t stop doing it if doesn’t grow in the future.”

Eddie Bauer will donate 20 kits through the High Fives Foundation for staff and athletes. Available now: $549 for the jacket; $499 for the bibs.

Berne Broudy
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Berne Broudy is a Vermont-based writer, photographer, and adventurer. She is passionate about conservation, education, and recreation, and has spent her adult life working to make the outdoors a place where all feel welcome with the gear and skills to enjoy it.