Xtratuf x Salmon Sisters Legacy Boot Review: The Daily Multitasker

Filed under: Boots  Footwear  Hunt / Fish  Hunting 

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Built by and for Alaskan anglers, the Xtratuf boot line is designed for hard work in the harshest conditions. In collaboration with Salmon Sisters, the classic Legacy boot becomes a stylish option for the serious outdoorswoman.

I’ve gone through multiple pairs of rubber boots in Montana’s varied and often intense climate. The necessity for tough gear in our northern climate brings to mind the reality that quality begets quantity. And in my case, it was time to try something new.

Xtratuf Legacy: Form, Function, Fashion

Enter the Xtratuf x Salmon Sisters 15-inch Legacy Boot. Built on a women’s last, the fit of this boot hit the mark. I have some trouble with sizing in boots, but these fit comfortably even with a thick sock at my typical size.

Triple-dipped latex neoprene sets the foundation for these boots. Coupled with a nonskid, nonmarking chevron sole, it feels incredibly solid in slick situations. It’s really a simple make. Beyond neoprene and chevron, the bells and whistles are limited.

The smart team-up with Alaska’s Salmon Sisters did add one admittedly adorable feature to these boots: the interior print. I opted for the Octopus pattern, but these also come in Fish & AnchorWhale, and Jellyfish.

The 15-inch boot, $135, easily folds down to show off the pattern, then flips back up if the full length is needed. And for those who’d like a shorter boot, there’s also a 12-inch option, $120, in Jellyfish.

Compliments and boot envy follow these boots wherever I roam. And I’m a fan of the Salmon Sisters’ promise: “For every item sold, Salmon Sisters donates a can of wild salmon to the Food Bank of Alaska.”

Wear and Tear

“Solid” is a great descriptor for the overall makeup of the boot. I spent last season in a pair of Bogs, and the holes for the handles became problematic during ice fishing and wading through slush, which seeped in at the calves.

There’s no such problem with the Xtratuf Legacy. Fifteen inches covers the majority of my lower leg. For women with wider calves, it’s a bit of a tighter squeeze. However, the width is equally comfortable when I fold them up for full coverage or down for more flexibility.

I’ve chopped wood, fed horses, watched whales, and trudged through rainy, slippery mud in these things without a problem. We’ve already had our first few snows in the hills of Montana, and I find myself reaching for them to slip on for a quick trip out to the car, or to run errands for a few hours in any measure of inclement weather. Wool socks fill in the gaps for the lack of insulation on colder days.

This particular pair of Xtratufs isn’t for the most frigid days, but the brand has other models to fill that role.

Salmon Sisters Styling: Looking Forward

As a lifelong equestrian, I needed rubber boots on a daily basis for barn chores. In the interest of frugality, I opted for cheaper brands. That overall investment added up over the years.

At a price point of $135, these most definitely aren’t the cheap rubber boots of my past. But I’ve paid more than that for the swath of boots that died hard deaths over the years. And the fashionable, fun ocean prints add a bit of panache to these workhorses.

With a few months under these boots and zero sign of wear, I’ll be paying attention to the long-term durability of these boots. And I’m certain they’ll experience a fair amount of duress over their lifetime.

Some patterns are sold out due to their popularity. But the collection remains available on both websites. Preorders for the Octopus boots are in motion via Salmon Sisters’ site.

If the Xtratuf x Salmon Sisters Legacy Boot lives up to the many positive reviews and to-date toughness, this pair will take me through years of errands, river days, and barn time.

tagged: review
Nicole QualtieriNicole Qualtieri
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Based in Montana, Nicole Qualtieri is GearJunkie's Hunt/Fish Editor. She’s an avid outdoorswoman, and you can find her anywhere from the back of a good horse in Whitefish to solo hunting the breaks of Montana, to backpacking with her border collie in the Absarokas.
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