Therm-a-Rest Questar 32 sleeping bag
Photo credit: Bard Basberg/Therm-a-Rest

Mummy Moves: Therm-a-Rest Questar Sleeping Bag Review

The curse of the mummy is more than just a B movie. The industry-standard sleeping bag shape leaves many feeling too confined, like a, well, coffin. Therm-a-Rest set out to solve that with its W.A.R.M. FIT Questar sleeping bag. I took it for a spin — and roll, and toss — to find out.

Bound in my mummy bag, I can’t help but ponder the details of this design while tucked in the dark tomb of my tent. I’m aware that the “mummy” shape is intended to provide added warmth, but it’s often at the cost of comfort for side, shifting, and fetal-position sleepers like me. Therm-a-Rest claims it resolved this issue with its new W.A.R.M FIT (“With Additional Room for Multiple positions”) design.

I tested the W.A.R.M.-equipped Questar 32-degree down bag on an autumn Middle Fork river trip with grave concerns over comfort deep in remote, wet wilderness. I hate being cold, and with rain and 30-degree temperatures in the forecast, I expected to be shivering through the damp nights — confined to my least favorite (mummified) sleeping position.

But like my favorite scary campfire stories with happy endings, not only did I wake up perfectly warm, I even removed my jacket and beanie cap and found myself comfortably curled up on my side. Even my feet were toasty.

How does it work and what did I like? Read on for my thoughts on this new take on sleeping bag comfort.

Therm-a-Rest Questar Sleeping Bag Review

Questar 32 Sleeping Bag Specs

  • MSRP: $220 (small), $240 (regular), $260 (long)
  • Fit: Unisex
  • Temperature rating: 32F (also available in 20F/-6C and 0F/-18C)
  • Shape: Mummy
  • Fill: 650
  • Total weight: 1 lb. 11 oz. (small), 1lb. 14 oz. (regular), 1lb. 15 oz. (long)
  • Fits up to (length): 5’6″ (small), 6′ (regular), 6’6″ (long)
  • Shoulder girth: 58″ (small), 63″ (regular), 66″ (long)
  • Hip girth: 58″ (small), 61″ (regular), 64″ (long)
  • Stuff size: 6.5″ x 8.5″

W.A.R.M. FIT

The W.A.R.M FIT design elements allow this bag to perform exactly as it claims it will. The Questar’s roomier, human-shaped fit allows for tossing and turning, and the SynergyLink Connectors help secure the sleeping bag to the pad underneath.

This proves handy, as movers and shakers are more likely to roll off. And because I like to keep my face covered while I sleep, I appreciated the roomier hood design that also accommodates a Therm-a-Rest Airhead or other camp pillow.

Therm-a-Rest Questar 32 sleeping bag

Temperature Rating

The Questar comes in three temperature options: 32F/0C, 20F/-6C, and 0F/-18C. The 32F/0C I tested is the newest addition to the line for spring 2020.

Again, as someone who gets cold easily, I initially balked at this option. But I quickly realized a 20-degree bag would have been too warm on a 30-degree night.

Inside, 650-fill Nikwax hydrophobic down resists damp; Therm-a-Rest claims it absorbs 90 percent less water and dries three times faster than untreated down. Best of all, my feet stayed toasty thanks to the Questar’s contoured footwarmer.

Packability

Although the bag doesn’t qualify as ultralight (1 pound 14 ounces for the regular 32F/0C bag), it does pack down reasonably small in a stuff sack. I still wouldn’t make it my go-to bag for ultralight backpacking trips, but it’s certainly small enough to fit into many packs.

Without a doubt, I will choose the Questar for summer car camping and river trips when I want to sleep like the dead — in the position of my choice — after a big adventure. Look for it in spring 2020.