Made In Minneapolis: Trash Bags’ Mega Messenger Pack

Filed under: Biking  Packs 

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Pack designer Andy Larson had to break the tradition of naming his made-in-Minneapolis bags after waste management containers. At 8,000+ cubic inches of main compartment space, “Monster” is a name that came easily.

This mega backpack is one of the biggest ever commercially built. Larson, a former bike courier who’s been making bags full time for seven years, touts it’s the largest messenger bag on the market.

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Since 2008, when he launched Trash Bags, Larson has strived to bring the lessons he learned as a courier to the construction of high-quality, custom bags.

In recent years, bicycle delivery has transitioned from documents to dinner, and a need has emerged for bags to match. Engineered for food-delivery loads, the Monster bag holds flat, bulky containers that can’t be smashed.

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Details include heavy stitching, bungee loops, and padded straps with attachment points

It’s a backpack for 16 pizzas. Or nine catering trays. Or two small humans.

It’s not a coincidence that this mega-pack is still just narrow enough, at about 23 inches wide, to fit through apartment doors. It sits perfectly on the deck of a Bullitt cargo bike.

Inside Trash Bags HQ: Andy Larson works on some detail stitching (left), and Anna sews with work-in-progress  bags hanging on a wall behind her
Inside Trash Bags HQ: Andy Larson works on some detail stitching (left), and Anna sews with work-in-progress bags hanging on a wall behind her

Hard, insulated walls keep the waterproof behemoth upright and protect the contents. An adjustable-height shelf provides structure and can separate hot and cold sections or multiple orders.

Additional loads can be managed using the external bungee loops and other attachment points. External pockets and a vertical pouch leave room for courier essentials at easy reach.

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A clear vinyl pouch on the back lets the rider fly their company’s flag.

The custom bag pictured in this article is destined for Forward Courier in Milwaukee, Wis., but it is modeled by Collin from Minneapolis’ Rock-It Delivery.

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The Monster is not cheap, at $475, but for delivery services the mega-bag can vastly expand capabilities to tote almost anything you may want to move by a bike.

–Bjorn Christianson writes “The Low Five,” a weekly column examining the world of biking through the lens of the Minneapolis cycling scene. All photos (c) Bjorn Christianson; see more on Flickr.com.

 

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