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The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

We’ve tested the best wrinkle-resistant, quick-drying, and comfortable travel pants for men this year. Pack your bags and get ready for an adventure.
(Photo/Steve Graepel)
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Have your flights booked? We’ve got your backside covered with the best men’s travel pants on the market for 2024.

From the Andean cloud forests to deep desert canyons, to long backcountry road trips and Parisian markets, these pants have been tested to tackle any adventure and do it all in style. Our travel-worn team has beaten paths around the globe in these slacks, and we’ve tested over 150 different pairs for almost a decade now. If it’s got the right stuff, we’ve saddled up in a pair.

Scroll through to see all of our recommended buys. At the end of our list, be sure to check out our comprehensive buyer’s guide. Curious just what makes a pant fit for the rigors of travel? Take a peek at our FAQ section. And if you’re still on the fence (or trying to sneak in under a carry-on weight limit), consult our comparison chart.

Editor’s Note: We updated this guide on May 15, 2024, to add two new worthy travel trousers to the mix: the DUER NuStretch Slim 5-Pocket — a cotton/nylon/spandex pant that has stretch to spare, as well as the Helly Hansen Holmen 5 Pocket Pant, another stellar 5-pocket option.

The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024


Best Overall Men's Travel Pants

Bluffworks Envoy Lightweight Travel Pants

Specs

  • Fabric 57% recycled polyester, 33% polyester, 10% spandex
  • Fabric weight 210 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 15 oz.
  • DWR No
Product Badge The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Lightweight fabric dries quickly
  • Wrinkle resistant
  • Looks and feels more recreational than the Ascenders
  • Anti-UV properties
  • More comfortable than most pants on the list

Cons

  • The rear device pocket is uncomfortable to sit on a phone in the back phone pocket
  • Lacks a DWR
Best Budget Men's Travel Pants

UNIONBAY Rainier Travel Chinos

Specs

  • Fabric 94% nylon, 6% spandex
  • Fabric weight 173 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 13 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Security options
  • Well priced

Cons

  • Pants run long
  • Material tends to collect lint
Best Travel Pants for Adventuring In

LIVSN Ecotrek Trail Pants

Specs

  • Fabric 70% Blue Ocean nylon, 25% nylon, 5% spandex
  • Fabric weight 173 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 13 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Form and function meet the apex pant
  • Bomber hardware
  • Tons of pockets with versatile security options

Cons

  • DWR is negligible
  • Styling is less formal
Best Travel Pants to Look Like a Local

Western Rise Evolution 2 Pants

Specs

  • Fabric 90% nylon, 10% elastane, woven in Sweden, cut and sewn in the USA
  • Fabric weight 107 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 11 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Lightweight material breathes just as well as the first
  • More durability than the first iteration
  • Fantastic fit and construction
  • Better mobility than the first iteration

Cons

  • New fabric feels slightly stiffer (breaks in over time)
  • Patch on the inside pocket can feel sticky against the legs (they are changing it to a print)
  • Single security pocket is limiting for some travelers
Most Comfortable Travel Pants

Proof 72-Hour Merino Travel Pant

Specs

  • Fabric 47% merino wool, 33% nylon, 14% polyester, 6% elastane
  • Fabric weight 247 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 16.5 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Merino wool!
  • Stylish
  • Gusseted crotch
  • Good fit and stretch

Cons

  • Pricey — $200 can buy you two (or three) other pants
  • Weighs an ounce or two more than other similar pants
  • Lacks a dedicated device pocket
  • One length (32) runs long – but is a better fit for tall men
Best of the Rest

Teren Lightweight Traveler Pants

Specs

  • Fabric 88% nylon, 12% spandex
  • Fabric weight 154 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 11 oz.
  • DWR No
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Pre-treated with an insect repellant
  • Stain resistant
  • Internal drawstring for extra waist security
  • Three zipper-closed pockets
  • Lightweight
  • SPF 50
  • Tanto-style pocket to clip your EDC

Cons

  • Magnetic closure catches on anything metal
  • No durable water repellant finish

KÜHL Suppressor Jogger

Specs

  • Fabric 85% nylon, 15% spandex
  • Fabric weight 165 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 12 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Light and packable
  • Durable and stretchy
  • KÜHL drop in style pockets are fantastic

Cons

  • Fabric is noisy
  • No button-no fly minimalism may not appeal to everyone
  • Only one zippered pocket on the backside

Ornot Mission Pants

Specs

  • Fabric 95% nylon, 5% elastane
  • Fabric weight 232 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 14 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Gusseted design gives a great fit
  • Reflective details on cuffs
  • Made in USA

Cons

  • Not many – An extra pockets or a drop in phone sleeve, and these would be our top choice for travel pants

Jetty Acadia 2.0 Utility Pant

Specs

  • Fabric 100% polyester
  • Fabric weight 240 gsm
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 16 oz.
  • DWR No
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Good stretch
  • Comfortable fit
  • Drawstring and belt loops

Cons

  • Only available in a 32 inseam
  • Pants stretch and lightly pill over time
  • Front occasionally unbuttons too easily

KETL Mountain Apparel Shenanigan Outdoor Pant

Specs

  • Fabric 96% nylon, 4% spandex
  • Fabric weight 156 gsm
  • Fit Slim
  • Weight 12 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Great DWR
  • Integrated web belt
  • Three zippered pockets (two in back and one behind the thigh)
  • Deep mesh hand pockets
  • Quiet material
  • Lifetime free repair program
  • Free shipping and returns

Cons

  • Slim fit won’t appeal to some. Slimmest pant in the lineup
  • Front snap is weak
  • Metal belt clasp may invite a wanding at TSA

Orvis O.O.O.O. 5-Pocket Pants

Specs

  • Fabric 51% cotton, 45% nylon, 4% Lycra
  • Fabric weight 213 gsm
  • Fit Casual boot cut, true to size
  • Weight 12 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Good DWR
  • Classically inspired 5-pocket design
  • Hidden 6th zippered pocket in right rear pocket
  • Reflective strips sewn inside both legs for visibility

Cons

  • Smallest size is 32”
  • No gusset for extra mobility. Not that they need it.
  • Slightly less fashionable option to Western Rise’s Evolution 2

Eddie Bauer Guide Pro End-to-Ender Pants

Specs

  • Fabric 56% CORDURA® nylon, 37% nylon, 7% spandex
  • Fabric weight Unnkown
  • Fit True to size
  • Weight 12 oz.
  • DWR Yes
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • DWR
  • Burly CORDURA fabric
  • UPF 50
  • Seven pocket design with three that close securely

Cons

  • Limited color ways
  • Backcountry styling doesn’t blend as well in the city

Municipal Overland Cargo

Specs

  • Fabric 98% cotton ripstop, 2% spandex
  • Fabric weight 160 gsm
  • Fit Athletic
  • Weight 13 oz.
  • DWR No
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Forward style
  • Six pockets, with three that zip shut, and one that snaps shut
  • Draw cord around the bottom hem
  • Elastic waist

Cons

  • No DWR
  • Offered in one length
  • Limited color ways
  • Treading into expensive territory for a simple pull-up cargo pant

DUER NuStretch Slim 5-Pocket

Specs

  • Fabric 60% cotton, 35% nylon, 5% spandex
  • Fabric Weight Unknown
  • Fit Slim
  • Weight Unavailable
  • DWR No
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Cotton/nylon/spandex blend has a soft finish and good stretch
  • Stealth pocket on right thigh conceals a phone
  • Five pockets overall offers a good amount of storage
  • Gusset allows for great mobility, even in a slim fit

Cons

  • Slim fit might not be for everyone, also available in a relaxed fit
  • No DWR finish

Helly Hansen Holmen 5 Pocket Pant

Specs

  • Fabric 94% polyamide, 6% elastane
  • Fabric Weight Unknown
  • Fit Athletic
  • Weight 14 oz.
  • DWR PFC-free DWR
The Best Men’s Travel Pants of 2024

Pros

  • Understated, but very comfortable
  • Warp stretch twill material has impressive stretch
  • Bluesign-approved with a PFC-fee DWR finish
  • Outdoors-oriented fit and cut

Cons

  • Thigh pocket isn't in the best placement
  • Limited number of colorways

Men’s Travel Pants Comparison Chart

Travel PantsPriceFabricFabric WeightWeightDWR
Bluffworks Envoy Lightweight Travel Pants
$12557% recycled polyester, 33% polyester, 10% spandex210 gsm15 oz.No
UNIONBAY Rainier Travel Chinos$4094% nylon, 6% spandex173 gsm13 oz.Yes
LIVSN Ecotrek Trail Pants$12970% Blue Ocean nylon, 25% nylon, 5% spandex173 gsm13 oz.Yes
Western Rise Evolution 2 Pants$12890% nylon, 10% elastane107 gsm11 oz.Yes
Proof 72-Hour Merino Travel Pant
$19847% merino wool, 33% nylon, 14% polyester, 6% elastane247 gsm16.5 oz.No
Teren Lightweight Traveler Pants
$13088% nylon, 12% spandex154 gsm11 oz.No
KÜHL Suppressor Jogger$9985% nylon, 15% spandex165 gsm12 oz.Yes
Ornot Mission Pants$14895% nylon, 5% elastane232 gsm14 oz.Yes
Jetty Acadia 2.0 Utility Pant$100100% polyester240 gsm16 oz.No
KETL Mountain Apparel Shenanigan Outdoor Pant
$10096% nylon, 4% spandex156 gsm12 oz.Yes
Orvis O.O.O.O. 5-Pocket Pants
$12951% cotton, 45% nylon, 4% Lycra213 gsm12 oz.Yes
Eddie Bauer Guide Pro End-to-Ender Pants
$11956% CORDURA nylon, 37% nylon, 7% spandexUnknown12 oz.Yes
Municipal Overland Cargo
$12898% cotton ripstop, 2% spandex160 gsm13 oz.No
DUER NuStretch Slim 5-Pocket
$13960% cotton, 35% nylon, 5% spandexUnknownUnknownNo
Helly Hansen Holmen 5 Pocket Pant
$10094% polyamide, 6% elastaneUnknown14 oz.Yes
Airports can be uncomfortable, so do yourself a favor and spend your travel days in the most comfortable pants you can find; (photo/Steve Graepel)

How We Tested Men’s Travel Pants

There are few other products we test at GearJunkie that are considered non-negotiable in society. Outside the house, you gotta wear pants (or shorts). And if you’re choosing shorts, you’re probably not looking at the right pants. Travel pants are part of our everyday uniform allowing us to test them daily. We test pants for the office grind, after-school errands, dispatching weekend chores, and yes, of course, travel, constantly logging test hours to find the best travel pants on the market.

Cozy in coach, capable of tackling adventure, but formal enough to wear to dinner, travel pants span the use case spectrum. We’ve worn them on intercontinental flights to Germany, Italy, France, and Slovenia, as well as transcontinental flights from Jacksonville to Boise. In warmer climates, we’ve pulled them out of our bikepacking bags on cool nights in Nicaragua and high up on the Colombian Coffee Triangle. One tester even wore his pair to the top of the Grand Teton.

When we get our hands on a new pant, we first take a look at the materials. We gauge the fabric weight, breathability, and the material’s ability to resist wrinkling. Synthetics with a DWR will pack down smaller, bounce back from being jammed in luggage on an overnight flight, and resist stains (and spills) better than cotton.

A touch of spandex affords some stretch and nylon tends to be more durable. We then turn them inside out to look at the seams joining the pants together, looking at where costs were cut and potential quality issues might cause a blowout on the road.

To be considered for our list, pants need at least one pocket that can be zipped shut to safely secure a passport or wallet. The hand pockets should be deep enough to keep keys and change from accidentally spilling out, or have zippers that prevent mishaps. No joke, one pair of pants we tested (not on this list) spit a wallet out at work without us even knowing it.

We then evaluated each pant’s fit, durability, packability, ability to bounce back from repeated wash and wear, and unpacking. We want to find out if a pair of pants can be washed in the sink in the evening and be ready to wear the following morning.

We want to see if the material resists wrinkling. And we want to know if the pants are cut too large, too small, or hike up the legs. The best material and construction alone can’t fake a good fit. We test pants for mobility and proper length. Does the pant bind in the crotch? Are the gussets appropriate? Are the legs cut at a proper length or do they ride up when walking?

Our testing focuses primarily on comfort, versatility, and functionality when in transit, so if you’re looking for something more durable for active pursuits, check out our picks for the best hiking pants. We also have a guide for the best women’s travel pants to get your travel companion ready for the long haul.

(Photo/Steve Graepel)

Testing History

Steve Graepel has been leading the men’s travel pant buyer guide since 2015. Over the span of 8 years, Graepel has seen over 225 pairs of travel pants, rigorously testing 150 pants. Graepel has worked at GearJunkie as a contributing editor since 2009, testing everything from packrafts, to bike bags, sleeping bags, winter boots, and trail runners. His latest beat is travel pants and flannels. Before his time as a fashion blogger, he wrote for Travel Idaho, National Geographic Adventure, Patagonia’s Tin Shed, Trail Runner, and Gear Patrol.

Graepel has researched and tested travel pants extensively — traveling, working, and camping in the high alpine desert of Idaho, Montana, and Utah, and traveling abroad in a variety of environments including Europe, Asia, Central, and South America. He continues to test travel pants year-round and searches for anyone who will listen to his yarns about the best travel trousers.

In 2020, we tried 27 pairs and listed 15 pants on our men’s buyers guide. In 2021, we tested an additional 35 pairs, highlighting nine new pants on our list. In 2022 we saw an additional 23 pairs, adding six new pants. In 2023 we looked at 38 pairs, adding seven new pants to the men’s travel pant buyer’s guide. Finally, in 2024, we’ve reviewed 27 pants, updating our Men’s Travel Pants buyer guide with nine new pants.

Each year introduces new styles and materials, and we try to reflect the best on the market of that year. Some trousers remain on the list, year after year. They are either so good, or so good of a deal, that they are tough to topple.

To keep a finger on the pulse of pants, we read reviews from top sites and contact manufacturers directly. Steve Graepel has regular conversations with pant brand owners and representatives in the travel pant space. These relationships allow us to stay up to date on what makes pants better every year, and keep an eye on sleeper pants that just don’t have the marketing budget to get mass attention.

A good pair of travel pants should look great as you explore the streets of foreign cities, but they should also be rugged enough to handle side excursions; (photo/Steve Graepel)

Buyer’s Guide: How to Choose Travel Pants

Fit

Regardless of whether the pants are straight-leg or slim, a good pair is one that follows the human form and doesn’t bag out after repeated washings, or bloat when packed with your phone and keys. The length should fit your inseam or run longer so you can roll them up or get them tailored.

Almost every pant on our list has a great fit. If they didn’t, we’ve shared the cons. Both the Jetty’s and UNIONBAY’s pants ran a little long. On the other end, Municipal’s Overland Cargo is short by design and is only available in one length. Both Eddie Bauer and Orvis offer a variety of inseams for a dialed fit (from 30″ to 34″). To dial in the fit of the waist for models with belt loops, we typically try to find a travel and adventure-friendly belt that allows us to get through TSA without needing to remove it.

(Photo/Emily Malone)

Function

We scored each pant for both its ability to adventure, wear in coach, and hit the streets. Some pants, like KETL Mountains Shenanigans, have a bias for stout use. The Shenanigans are coated with a solid DWR and are our choice for adventure trips where you can’t sacrifice durability.

If traveling by plane, we prefer comfortable pants with accessible pockets. While 5-pocket styled jeans or chinos wear well on the street, their pockets are harder to access when sitting on the plane. Instead, we prefer a jogger or cargo pant that has vertical zippered pockets and drop-in device pockets on the legs.

Both Municipal and KÜHL had easy-to-access pockets in the plane. Eddie Bauer’s Guide Pro End-to-Ender has two generous thigh pockets. But both are sewn into the pants and tighten up over the thigh when seated. This makes it harder to pull the contents out.

For comfort in coach, you don’t need to look past Bluffworks Envoy. They look great and have plenty of pockets to stay organized. KÜHL’s Suppressor Jogger dialed in the drop-in pockets and is lightweight and durable, but the material isn’t nearly as soft as Eddie Bauer’s pants. It’s always a trade-off.

(Photo/Steve Graepel)

Style Matters

While comfort is key, we also need to be able to show ourselves in public (no washed-out gray sweatpants on this list). The most versatile travel clothes should be able to tackle a hike without getting roughed up, or walk into town looking sharp enough to peruse a museum, and duck in for fine dining afterward.

Unfortunately, the cargo pockets take away some formality while out on the town. With its jogger styling, KÜHL didn’t design around Michelin stars. They prioritized function and durability, mapping to utility. KÜHL, Municipal, and Eddie Bauer each have unique cargo styling that brings a touch of modernity to the military-inspired side-pocket pants. In general, we love cargo-style pants and joggers while sitting on the plane. It keeps all your essentials within reach.

On the other hand, Western Rise’s Evolution 2 and Proof’s 72-Hour Merino are fantastically styled everyday pants, but both have a single security pocket to maintain that sleek look. They are our go-to choice for travels to big cities where we want to kick up the look and feel at home while traveling abroad.

Clean lines, darker colors, and traditional styling help you blend into crowds and stave off the would-be pickpocket’s radar. The best men’s travel pants should look as good as they feel without shouting “tourist.”

The material should be lightweight and, in our preference, darker to minimize showing the dirt collected along the way. That said, we were astounded by how well a fresh DWR can resist stains on even the fairest beige pants.

(Photo/Steve Graepel)

Fabric Weight

Lightweight performance fabrics can withstand repeated washings in a sink, line dry overnight, and stay wrinkle-free after weeks on the go. Today’s fabrics offer advanced sun protection and moisture-wicking properties and are often water-resistant or water-repellent.

Fabric weight is measured in grams per square meter (GSM). A heavier GSM will take up more room in your bag and take longer to dry. We find a 200-ish GSM fabric weight, like on our top pick from Bluffworks, light and breezy, and dries out quickly.

A welterweight fabric will disappear in the bag and dry out insanely fast, but going too light sacrifices durability. All the pants we tested are durable enough to venture off the pavement.

If you want the lightest pant you can find, give KETL Mountain’s Shenanigan a look. The 156 GSM fabric rolls up tight and is exceptionally durable. Western Rise also uses a lighter GSM fabric, but the pants weigh more overall.

Travel pant fabrics should be breathable, durable, and easy to clean; (photo/Steve Graepel)

Fabric Type

A cotton blend fabric adds breathability and a cooling effect, which is great for warmer climates, but can also sacrifice durability. And, unless treated with a DWR, cotton can wet out more easily and hold water longer.

The Orvis and Municipal’s Overland Cargo weave some cotton into their blend. To beef up the durability, the natural fiber is woven with a synthetic like polyester or nylon and an elastic component for stretch.

If you choose to go with denim or cotton, consider a stretchy fabric with a bit of spandex or elastane for comfort and flexibility while on the road. It will resist wear longer, dry faster, and feel much more comfortable. While not on this year’s list, Aviator’s The Best Travel Jeans in the World are very comfortable and weave in some stretch, but they weigh nearly twice as much as every other pant on the list. Our cotton choices keep the weight down.

Most of the pants on this list are woven from synthetic fibers. Synthetics tend to stand up to more abuse than their natural counterparts. For example, Ornot’s Mission Pant is incredibly durable and is built for men who abuse pants while in the saddle.

Unique this year, we saw a merino wool synthetic blend with Proof’s 72-Hour Merino Travel Pant. Wool is known for its odor-resistant and insulative qualities. Contrary to what you might think, they stay surprisingly cool and breathe well in hot climates. For durability and stretch, Proof weaves nylon, polyester, and a touch of elastane.

Weaving in spandex or elastic adds mobility, but can also give the pants a polished, slick finish. KÜHL weaves in a whopping 15% spandex into the material, but most pants will have between 2-6% for a combination of durability and mobility. Bluffworks, Unionbay, and Jetty feel more formal with their smooth-faced fabric finishes. Material finishes are more of a personal preference and don’t affect their water resistance, which is added with a DWR wash.

Our favorite pants come from Bluffworks. While the fit is fantastic, they don’t have a DWR. This makes them less desirable if you are traveling to places that rain a lot. However, they excel in so many other ways that they still stand out as our top choice. On the flip side, Western Rise’s DWR not only deflects dirt and grime on the road, but liters of beer simply rolled off them at Oktoberfest. We really took one for the team while testing.

Performance fabrics are standing up to heavy use like never before. Shelling out a few more bucks for quality generally gets you into a more durable pant that should hold up to more extensive use. We’ve put in countless hours testing the pants on this list, so you’re starting in the right place.

LIVSN (left) uses both flat-felled and welted overlocked seams. Eddie Bauer’s Guide Pro End-to-Ender (middle left) double stitches all overlocked seams. While Municipal overlocks all their seams, only some are welted with a double stitch (middle right). Western Rise (right) stitches the inseam a single plain seam for comfort; (photo/Steve Graepel)

Seam Construction

Seams are often overlooked. Out of sight, out of mind, seams bring two patches of fabric together and are crucial for durability and comfort. But this is where we can differentiate the good from the great, and this is where we get passionately nerdy.

Flat-felled seams are best for joining heavy fabrics together. Think denim. The material doesn’t stretch and the fabric is woven from heavy cotton yarn. You want a solid seam to join the pants together. The fabric is joined, then rolled over itself and double stitched for a clean, bomber fasten.

None of the pants on our list are joined entirely from flat-felled seams, though LIVSN and Proof incorporate a flat-fell seam on at least one leg seam. In general, we find it more important to flat-fell the inseam of the pants (which is what Proof does).

Too much material tacked together with a flat-fell seam can cause rubbing against the legs. And most travel pants are constructed from lighter-weight fabrics, so pants don’t always need this extra durable seam construction.

They can get away with a less expensive, and more comfortable overlocked seam. An overlocking stitch, or welt-seam, has a lower profile, leaving the raw edge exposed but sewn down to the pant. Plus they are nearly as durable as the venerable flat-felled stitch, but can feel more comfortable.

Some overlocked stitches aren’t tacked down. That is, the seam isn’t locked down flat with a second row of stitching, leaving the surged seam exposed on the inside. This usually isn’t a big deal. Our main concern would be that the stitching could get caught on something and start to unravel. But we haven’t ever had this experience and it’s a fine option to use when binding two lightweight materials together. Orvis, Ornot, and even Bluffworks uses a combination of overlocked and welted overlocked seams.

The simplest seam, or plain seam, joins the two sides together with a simple, single stitch. Often the cut material is finished with a surger to prevent the material from fraying, but the joining seam itself is sewn together with a single stitch, and the exposed edges butterfly on the inside of the pant.

This is often used for lightweight material where want to reduce the bulk as much as possible. We see this used on Western Rise’s Evolution 2. In theory, this is not a highly durable seam construction. And we’ve seen this kind of seam unravel on a few pants we’ve tested. We’ve also been beating our Western Rise’s for years now and have yet to see their plain seam blow.

The author testing Western Rise’s DWR — or DBR — at Oktoberfest; (photo/Steve Graepel)

FAQ

What are the most comfortable travel pants?

We like a pant that doesn’t ride up or bind when seated, and moves with you when active. DUER and KÜHL are very close at the top, for pure comfort, you can’t beat Bluffworks Envoy. Beyond the fantastic material, the pant is is available in slim and regular fit, so there’s truly a comfortable pant for everyone’s preference.

KETL Mountain Apparel’s Shenanigan (left) laughs at spills, while Municipal’s Overland Cargo’s show cotton’s weakness; (photo/Steve Graepel)
Which pants have the best DWR?

We’ve tested Western Rise’s Evolution lineup standing outside in Bogota monsoon season, climbing snow and ice on the Grand, and prosting over beers at Oktoberfest. The DWR not only sheds spills, but it deflects dirt and grime too.

After a week of wearing them across the Alps, including a day sitting in the stairwell of an overbooked train to Munich, we were shocked at how clean our light khaki Evolution 2.0s walked off the return flight. We were also impressed with KETL Mountain’s Shenanigan’s. Water immediately beads off the surface.

What are the fastest-drying pants?

If you’re bringing one pair of pants, you’ll eventually have to wash them while on the road. A lightweight synthetic pant is your best bet for a comfortable morning. Here again, Western Rise’s Evolutions rose to the top. They are lightweight, durable, and dry out quicker than most. They also remain cool and breezy in hot climates and wear supremely well.

What are the best cargo-style pants?

The pair of large cargo pockets on Muncipal’s Overland Cargo are easy to access and have plenty of space to hold your kit and do it without looking like Urkel. For an equally impressive pocket game, but a more polished look, we recommend looking at Bluffworks Envoy, which stealthily hides nine pockets in the otherwise casual-looking chino. Eddie Bauer’s Guide Pro End-to-Ender is close, with seven practical and accessible pockets.

(Photo/Steve Graepel)
What are the most durable pants for travel?

With their high CORDURA count, the Eddie Bauers are tough to beat. Ornot’s Mission pants weaves a high nylon count, and come in a very close second for durability.

What are the best pants to wear on the plane?

For long flights on the plane, we like comfortable, casual look with easy pocket access. We give the nod to Municipal’s Overland Cargo. The deep horizontal pockets are easy to access while seated and the high cotton count breathes well.

What are the most flexible travel pants?

KÜHL’s Suppressor Joggers have the highest spandex count on the list at 15%. They are super flexible, light, durable, and have a good DWR. For a more formal look, Bluffworks has an equally impressive spandex weave (10%) and is by far the most comfortable pant on our list. 

For a good combination of flexibility, durability, and all-around wearability, we recommend Western Rise’s Evolution 2. If you want to splurge, we also liked Proof’s 72-Hour Merino Travel Pant, which blends 6% elastane into the wool-synthetic base. Proof’s pants are nearly a one-and-done purchase. They are durable and stay stench-free on the road, making them the only pants you may need to bring.

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