Carbon-Handled 'Sebenza 21' Knife Is a Razor-Sharp Gem

Carbon-Handled ‘Sebenza 21’ Knife Is a Razor-Sharp Gem

Filed under: Knives 

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Chris Reeve’s small Sebenza 21 Insingo in carbon fiber is the best custom knife you can buy without selling your Subie. Find out why in this review.

Sebanza custom knife carbon fiber

The Chris Reeve Sebenza is rightfully considered to be in the upper echelon of knives. When asked for affordable custom recommendations, I always mention the Sebenza first because of its high quality.

I’ve handled knives that cost five figures, and they are undoubtedly better than the Sebenza. But most people can only dream of such an ostentatious prospect.

And it’s not a stretch to say the Sebenza is equal to those more expensive knives in terms of materials, design, fit, and finish.

Chris Reeve Sebenza 21: The Insingo Blade

Even the best can get better. The top-notch version of the Sebenza 21 is exclusive to a single retailer – Knife Art.

Owner Rodney Connolly helped develop a new blade shape for the Sebenza 21 called the Insingo. Somewhere between a Wharncliffe and a drop point, the result is a blade with a “continuous curve cutting edge.”

The Sebenza’s Insingo blade allows virtually any part of the edge to do real work. The blade shape alone makes this knife excel. Add its carbon fiber construction that chops off a full ounce of weight, and you have perfection.

The S35VN Steel with 59-60 Rockwell hardness is a top-notch steel. The handle is 6Al4V Titanium on the lock side and carbon fiber on the front side. It’s a thing of beauty.

Sebanza knife review

The Wrap-Up

The Chris Reeve small Sebenza 21 Insingo is just the right size for those of us out-massed by pro wrestlers. And a carbon fiber Sebenza with Insingo blade conquers all others.

If you’re looking for a great knife or want something to give as a gift to your best friend or kidney donor, this is it. The Insingo carbon fiber model costs a bit more than the regular Sebenza ($450), but the added price is worth it.

This isn’t your typical knife. Instead, consider it a piece of functional, handmade art, and the hefty price tag is a little more understandable.

And if you were considering a Sebenza in the first place, price is probably not your first priority. This is an easy, brainless must-buy if you’re a well-heeled knife nut.

The only conceivable caveat of this Insingo-bladed knife is its exclusivity. There aren’t a lot of them, so don’t hesitate to snap one up.

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