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The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Flannel up this fall to hike, operate the tailgate grill, or tame the fall foliage. We've found the best classic wool, cotton, and technical flannel shirts for men.

Best Men's Flannels
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Ask the GearJunkie staff what their favorite season is, and it would undeniably be flannel season — doing fall chores, warming up by the fire, and simply working from home. As hot days give way to cool mornings, we’re all looking forward to flanneling up.

Today’s flannel is a far cry from the Seattle grunge scene or Paul Bunyan’s tack shop. More technical, less scratchy, and all-around comfortable, there are endless options for purveyors of plaid.

To find the best flannels for 2023-2024, we combed through stores, scoured online, and spoke with brands to find the best options available. To test the flannels, we wore them at work, hammered through weekend chores, brought them camping, and occasionally shouldered them as we tossed our legs over a bike.

What makes the perfect flannel? We looked at materials, cut, and construction, excusing color and patterns. Color schemes are more personal, and we’ll let you pick what looks best in your wardrobe. Grab your s’mores or pumpkin spice latte and get ready to arm yourself with what truly differentiates a quality flannel from the rest. The following flannels will last for seasons to come.

To find the best flannels for men, scroll through to see all of our recommended buys or jump to the category you’re looking for. And once you’ve done that, check out our comprehensive buyer’s guide to unravel what makes a flannel a flannel, our chart to see how our choices stack up against one another, and our FAQ for any lingering questions.

Editor’s Note: We updated this guide on September 27, 2023, adding a number of our new favorite flannels, as well as expanding upon our flannel testing history.

The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024


Best Overall Flannel

MuskOx Grand Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 100% BCI approved cotton
  • Fabric weight 300 g/m²
  • Garment weight 1 lb., 3.5 oz.
  • Fit Appropriately roomy
  • Best for Wear it for chores or to the bar. If you just want one flannel to punch up your wardrobe, the MuskOx Grand will land it with a TKO.
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • High-quality Egyptian and US sourced BCI cotton
  • Milled and sewn in Portugal
  • Built like a tank
  • Fat loop to hang the shirt in the nape of the neck
  • 22 solid and plaid patterns to choose from

Cons

  • Too much flannel for some
  • Cotton weft shows early pilling around the wrist
Best Budget Flannel

Legendary Whitetails Buck Camp Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 100% cotton
  • Fabric weight 144 g/m²
  • Garment weight 14 oz.
  • Fit Relaxed
  • Best for Spring to fall everyday flannel for yard work and camping
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Fantastic construction at this price
  • Double pleat on the back for extra flexibility

Cons

  • The collar loses form easily
Best Everyday Flannel

Patagonia Fjord Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 100% organic cotton
  • Fabric weight 220 g/m²
  • Garment weight 16 oz.
  • Fit Roomy
  • Best for Not too heavy, not too light, Patagonia’s Fjord Flannel is an iconic flannel for everyday use
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Impeccable craftsmanship
  • Organic cotton
  • Patagonia’s ‘Iron Clad’ guarantee

Cons

  • Somewhat of a boxy fit
Best Heavyweight Flannel

Pladra Fireside

Specs

  • Materials 100% cotton
  • Fabric weight 330 g/m²
  • Garment weight 1 lb., 5 oz.
  • Fit Fitted, slender in the sleeves
  • Best for A better blanket shirt in just about every way
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Luxuriously soft material
  • Heavy flannel remains pliable
  • Lifetime warranty

Cons

  • Wears too narrow in the sleeves to wear as an overshirt
Best Work Shirt Flannel

Devium Boca Flannel Shirt

Specs

  • Materials 100% US cotton
  • Fabric weight 220 g/m²
  • Garment weight 14.5 oz.
  • Fit Fits normal
  • Best for The Boca is tough-wearing flannel that’s American enough to make a bald eagle shed a tear of Miller Light
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Entirely Made in USA
  • Durable

Cons

  • Expensive, but the price reflects the backstory
  • A pencil slot would put the final nail in the shirt
Best of the Rest

ANIAN Berlino Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 80% recycled wool, 20% nylon
  • Fabric weight 500 g/m²
  • Garment weight 1 lb., 4 oz.
  • Fit Slim
  • Best for This is a deconstructed work shirt that looks and wears great around town. While it's up for the task, we find it too refined for hard labor
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Quality craftsmanship
  • Environment-friendly process
  • Well-priced for what you get
  • Weather resistant

Cons

  • Itchy
  • Chest pockets are small

prAna Westbrook Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 60% recycled cotton, 40% recycled poly
  • Fabric weight Unavailable
  • Garment weight 15 oz.
  • Fit More relaxed than billed
  • Best for People who play hard/work hard and need a quality, durable flannel
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Recycled cotton poly blend
  • Fully flat-felled construction

Cons

  • Fit is a little more relaxed than billed

Duluth Trading Co. Free Swingin’ Flannel Relaxed Fit Shirt

Specs

  • Materials 100% cotton
  • Fabric weight 158 g/m²
  • Garment weight 14 oz.
  • Fit Roomy
  • Best for Hard labor work shirt for warmer fall days
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • More durable than more brushed flannels
  • Fantastic mobility
  • Great price

Cons

  • Material is rough and thin, a diversion from most flannels

Good Man Brand Stadium Shirt Jacket

Specs

  • Materials 100% cotton
  • Fabric weight 155 g/m²
  • Garment weight 11.5 oz.
  • Fit Fitted
  • Best for Don’t judge a book by it’s branding, “The House of Love, Respect, and Care” released a legitimately great flannel for kicking back
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Modern cut is stylish
  • Well executed brushing makes this a superiorly soft flannel

Cons

  • Arguably over priced
  • Hidden chest pocket buttons are hard to manipulate

Eddie Bauer: Eddie’s Favorite Classic Fit Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 100% Cotton
  • Fabric weight 205 g/m²
  • Garment weight 12.5 oz.
  • Fit Appropriate length that feels fitted without binding
  • Best for Everyday work and casual dress
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Good value
  • Solid construction

Cons

  • The list price has crept up in years by about $10, but the shirt is always on sale

Wellen Hazy Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 98% polyester, 2% Lycra
  • Fabric weight 254 g/m²
  • Garment weight 13 oz.
  • Fit Relaxed
  • Best for A modern take on a vintage surf flannel. It’s an easy shirt to bring to the beach and is our go-to flannel for casual weekends.
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Well constructed
  • Fabric is soft and durable

Cons

  • Chest pocket is curved, not square – which makes it more decorative than functional
  • Expensive

Mountain Hardwear Plusher

Specs

  • Materials 100% organic cotton
  • Fabric weight 300 g/m²
  • Garment weight 1 lb., 5 oz.
  • Fit True-to-size
  • Best for Cool weather overshirt
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Great deal at $80
  • Soft and warm

Cons

  • Locker loop is too small for the weight of the flannel. It will likely pull out
  • Chest pocket button backers leave the otherwise great flannel feeling unfinished

Toad & Co Airsmyth Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 60% recycled cotton, 40% recycled poly
  • Fabric weight 115 g/m²
  • Garment weight 8 oz.
  • Fit Fitted — semi-athletic
  • Best for Semi-formal journeys or simply some extra warmth in coach
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Smart styling
  • Lightweight and breathable
  • Recycled materials
  • Well priced

Cons

  • Small wrist opening
  • No solid color offerings for this office friendly flannel

Faherty Legend Sweater Shirt

Specs

  • Materials 65% polyester, 30% viscose, 5% spandex
  • Fabric weight Unavailable
  • Garment weight 1 lb., 1 oz.
  • Fit Fitted
  • Best for Lazy fall days that you'd otherwise grab a sweatshirt
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • The most comfortable shirt on the list
  • Lots of color schemes and patterns to choose from

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Loosely woven material pills and can feel breezy
  • Panels are sewn together with an overlock stitch
  • Prone to snagging

Roark Diablo Flannel

Specs

  • Materials 51% recycled polyester, 46% polyester, 3% elastane
  • Fabric weight Unavailable
  • Garment weight 1 lb., 1.5 oz.
  • Fit Form-fitting
  • Best for The Diablo Flannel is our pick for the road where you want the extra measure of protection from wet weather and grime. The articulating gusset vents make this a good fall mountain bike shirt.
The Best Men’s Flannels of 2023-2024

Pros

  • Weather resistant DWR
  • Snap closure
  • Nice styling
  • Gusseted arm vents
  • Durable

Cons

  • Billed as Roark's "softest flannel." it’s one of the least brushed flannels on the our list.
The author testing flannels at Oktoberfest in Munich; (photo/Steve Graepel)

Comparison Chart

FlannelMaterialsFabric WeightGarment WeightFitPrice
MuskOx Grand Flannel100% BCI approved cotton300 g/m²1 lb., 3.5 oz.Appropriately roomy$134
Legendary Whitetails Buck Camp Flannel
100% cotton144 g/m²14 oz.Relaxed$35
Patagonia Fjord Flannel100% organic cotton220 g/m²16 oz.Roomy$99
Pladra Fireside
100% cotton330 g/m²1 lb., 5 oz.Fitted, slender in the sleeves$150
Devium Boca Flannel Shirt
100% US cotton220 g/m²14.5 oz.Fits normal$128
ANIAN Berlino Flannel
80% recycled wool, 20% nylon500 g/m²1 lb., 4 oz.Slim$141
prAna Westbrook Flannel
60% recycled cotton, 40% recycled polyUnavailable15 oz.More relaxed than billed$99
Duluth Trading Co. Free Swingin’ Flannel100% cotton
158 g/m²14 oz.Roomy$55
Good Man Brand Stadium Shirt Jacket
100% cotton155 g/m²11.5 oz.Fitted$148
Eddie Bauer: Eddie’s Favorite Classic Fit Flannel
100% cotton205 g/m²
12.5 oz.Appropriate length, fitted without binding$80
Wellen Hazy Flannel
98% polyester, 2% Lycra254 g/m²13 oz.Relaxed$118
Mountain Hardwear Plusher
100% organic cotton300 g/m²1 lb., 5 oz.True-to-size$85
Toad & Co Airsmyth Flannel
60% recycled cotton, 40% recycled poly115 g/m²8 oz.Fitted — semi-athletic$78
Faherty Legend Sweater Shirt65% polyester, 30% viscose, 5% spandexUnavailable1 lb., 1 oz.Fitted$178
Roark Diablo Flannel
51% polyester, 46% polyester, 3% elastaneUnavailable1 lb., 1.5 oz.Form-fitting$99

How We Tested Men’s Flannels

At GearJunkie, flannels are an extension of our everyday lifestyle. A shirt, a sweatshirt, a jacket — they are the most flexible garment we own. Unlike a tent, camp stove, or a pair of boots, we shoulder flannels daily, allowing us to put the brushed twill through the paces. We tested flannels daily at the office, and through the weekend, grinding through chores like cleaning the garage, raking leaves, or simply walking the dog on cool summer mornings.

Cozy in coach and a fashionable way to layer up, we always pack at least one flannel for travel. They’ve had our backs on 6-hour-long flights to Germany, Italy, France, and Slovenia, as well as transcontinental flights from Jacksonville to Boise. In warmer climates, we’ve flanneled up on cool nights on the Dariense Isabelia ridge in Nicaragua and high up on the Colombian Coffee Triangle.

To test flannels, we always start with how the material feels in the hand. We rate it for plushness, softness, and durability. We look at the fiber material, weave, and brushed finish. The material choice and finish is an indicator of how the manufacturer envisions the flannel should be worn and used, and it points us in the direction of how we should test the shirt. We want to see if the two align and how they stack up to the marketing story told online.

During real-world consideration, we aim to wear flannels for what they were made to do. For example, hard work-oriented flannels are worn doing tasks that are hard on a shirt. Specifically, we want to know how it accommodates range of motion. We want to know if we can swing a hammer or reach boards from the top shelf without exposing our torso or restricting motion in the arms. We also test it for snagging and durability. Does the flannel catch on wood, metal edges, or granite shards? Does it collect a lot of dust and grime?

Finally, we shoulder the flannels and evaluate them for fit. The best material and construction can’t fake a good fit. We test it for mobility and proper length. Does the shirt bind under the arms? Are the gussets appropriate? Does a straight-cut work without gussets? Are the arms or hem cut at a proper length or do they ride up when reaching? How does the shirt taper in the torso and arms?

Testing History

Steve Graepel has been leading the men’s flannel buyer guide since 2015. Over the span of 8 years, Graepel has seen over 200 flannel shirts, rigorously testing 87 flannels. Graepel has worked at GearJunkie as a contributing editor since 2009, testing everything from packrafts, to bike bags, sleeping bags, winter boots, and trail runners. His latest beat is travel pants and flannels. Before his time as a fashion blogger, he wrote for Travel Idaho, National Geographic Adventure, Patagonia’s Tin Shed, Trail Runner, and Gear Patrol. 

Graepel has researched and tested flannels extensively — traveling, working, and camping in the high alpine desert of Idaho, Montana, and Utah, and traveling abroad in a variety of environments including Europe and South America. He continues to long-term test flannels year-round and searches for anyone who will listen to his yarns testing the brushed twill.

In 2020, we saw 47 flannels and listed 15 flannels on our men’s buyers guide. In 2021, we tested an additional 20 flannels, highlighting nine new flannels on our list. In 2022 we saw an additional 20 flannels, adding 12 new flannels. And this year we looked at 33 flannels, adding 11 new flannels to the buyer’s guide.

Each year introduces new styles and materials, and we try to reflect the best on the market of that year. Some stalwart flannels remain on the list, year after year. They are either so good, or so good of a deal, that they are tough to topple.  

Flannels aren’t hard, but their simplicity makes it important to understand the details of a standout shirt. To keep a finger on the pulse, we read reviews from top sites and contact manufacturers directly. Steve Graepel has the owners of several companies on speed dial, and has had conversations with manufacturers and mills from around the world. It’s not uncommon for manufacturers to reach out to GearJunkie before they release a flannel to get a sense of the new lineup.

These relationships allow us to stay up to date on what makes flannels better every year, and keep an eye on sleeper flannels that just don’t have the marketing budget to get mass attention.

Buyer’s Guide: How to Choose a Flannel Shirt

There are plenty on the market today, and we shouldered a number of them to find the best flannel of 2023; (photo/Steve Graepel)

Materials

Wool used to own the flannel scene, and it has a lot of merits. It retains warmth when exposed to moisture, resists odors and UV light, and can block the wind. We love ANIAN’s heavyweight Berlino overshirt, which delivers all of these qualities with its wool construction. But there are other materials worth considering.

Cotton can be buttery soft and an obvious choice to wear next to skin. Pladra, Patagonia, MuskOx, and Mountain Hardwear all use high-end cotton. But not all cotton flannels are brushed to this extent. Devium’s Boca is lightly brushed and feels rougher. This makes it better for hardwearing activities in the yard or at the shop.

Some cottons are sourced from organic or Better Cotton Initiative (BCI) approved cotton fields. No synthetic pesticides or chemical fertilizers can be used in the cotton to achieve the rank of “organic cotton.” Patagonia’s Fjord, the Fireside from Pladra, and Mountain Hardwear’s Plusher all use organic cotton.

BCI-approved cotton meets sustainable standards that minimize pesticides, boost water conservation, and support better working conditions for farmers. Our top choices are from MuskOx sources BCI cotton. Either way, meeting either of these standards costs more money to achieve and the cost is passed onto the buyer. Expect to pay a little more for shirts that list either of these certifications.

In addition to cotton, there are a growing number of synthetic and synthetic blends on the market. Some of our testers wear flannels while hitting the trails high in the Rockies.

If you break a sweat in flannel — say mountain biking, skiing, or running — we recommend considering a synthetic flannel. They are easy to care for and can be thrown in the washer and tumbled in the dryer. Roark’s Diablo wicks moisture away from the body and has a DWR. Wellen’s Hazy will feel more plush and is our top pick for a synthetic flannel.

Fit

Like any shirt, flannels are offered in a variety of fits, from athletic and tailored to grandpa-style. If you prefer a tidy look or wear your flannel while active, a slimmer athletic fit, like Toad & Co’s Airsmyth, will be a good choice. But it can be a tradeoff with mobility. Without Lycra woven into the fabric, gussets, or mechanical weave, a tight, form-fitting flannel can bind behind the shoulders. Shirts like Roark’s Diablo get around this by adding gussets behind the shoulders which double as vents.

On the other end of the spectrum, MuskOx is oversized and has no pleating. The roomy cut still allows great mobility to reach and work without feeling too big.

When making a purchase, let your use case guide you to the right flannel fit. And if it’s a work shirt, consider sizing down for everyday wear. As an example, Filson work shirts (not on this list this year) are typically sized just short of Arnold Schwarzenegger. We always have to buy one size down when looking at Filson.

Note that this review covers the best flannel shirts for men. Looking for a women’s flannel? We have another flannel buyer’s guide specifically for women.

Ranging from 150 to >300+ g/m², the fabric weight of flannel can vary widely, and along with it the use profile; (photo/Steve Graepel)

Fabric Weights

Short for grams per meter squared meter, g/m² is the weight of one square meter of fabric. The heavier the weight, the thicker the material will be, and hence, the warmer that flannel will be. We generally follow the same ratings as we use in base layers.

  • Lightweight flannels fall under 150-190 g/m²
  • Midnight flannels sit between 200-250 g/m²
  • Heavyweight flannels weigh over 250 g/m²

Toad & Co uses 115 g/m² fabric and sits at the far end of lightweight. As you might guess, it is best for mild climates and casual wear. On the other end sits ANIAN’s Berlino, which uses a stout 500 g/m² wool blend and is supremely warm.

A heavier fabric doesn’t imply the material will be softer — which the Berlino is not. That soft, velvety feeling comes from brushing the material, giving it that lofty plush nap. A fabric with more nap can also be warmer than a fabric without it. The raised fibers trap air warmed from your body and work best as an insulator when worn under a jacket that can keep that warm air from flushing away. Our favorite heavyweight flannel, Pladra’s Fireside, leaves the outside unbrushed (for durability) and brushes the inside (which traps heat better and feels incredibly soft).

Buttons never go out of style, but there’s a difference between a cheap plastic button and a brass button. Some flannels, like Roark’s Diablo (left), use snaps in place of buttons. The Devium Boca (right) uses oversized buttons; (photo/Steve Graepel)

Closure Style

Flannel closure is a contentious debate at GearJunkie, and many editors have a soft spot for snaps. Often seen on western style shirts, they hold well and are quick and easy to get in and out of. Granted, we are an active crew of reviewers who wear our flannels on runs and rides. The only flannel on our list that uses snaps this year is Roark’s Diablo.

While we love the usability of snaps, they can be problematic. Snaps disrupt the material by punching holes through the placket — that strip of material that runs dead center down the shirt. In rare cases, snaps can pull through, which we’ve experienced more than once on a snap-style shirt.

“If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” — the button has been tried and true for some 5,000 years. Most buttons are constructed from hard plastics and are larger on heavier material. We prefer big buttons for heavier materials, which is one more reason to consider Devium’s Boca. Their horn buttons are custom-made in Pennsylvania and are the size of a penny.

Price

You can get into a flannel for as low as $35 from Legendary Whitetails, which is our bargain pick. Duluth Trading Co. offers a solid work shirt at an incredible value at $55.

But the midline of flannels seems to fall in around $80, which creeps into a lot of money territory. And there can be a lot of uninspiring shirts in this range that lean on their brand recognition, bright patterns, and color schemes to open your wallet.

Here too, you get what you pay for, and it’s a good place to start to look at materials and construction to ensure you are indeed getting good value. Premium construction methods, like hand-sewn, double or triple stitching, and eco-conscious product development, start to tack onto the bottom line.

Unless there’s a backstory to support the extra cost, shirts priced over $150 leave you wondering if you are paying for someone’s mortgage.

Faherty’s Legend Sweatshirt Flannel (left) uses exposed overstitched seams, while Patagonia (right) has fully flat-felled, double-stitched seams. Many flannels split the difference, like Devium’s Boca flannel, flat-felling the body, but flat sewing the overstitched armholes; (photo/Steve Graepel)

Construction

While quality materials matter, the construction of the shirt is what often defines a quality shirt. The best will have flat-felled seams that roll the opposing material together and tack the seam down with a double stitch. The result hides all the cut edges, leaving a clean-looking, durable shirt inside and out. These shirts will often be double- or triple-stitched in high-stress zones, like the shoulders and sides.

While more durable, flat-felling seams can make a shirt bulkier, and not every mill can pull off this level of construction. So flat-felled flannels tend to be more expensive.

Pladra, Patagonia, and yes, even Legendary Whitetails use a flat-fell seam and vary the stitch count for extra durability where you need it most.

Many shirts use a more common overlock or surge stitch, where the two opposing panels are butted together and stitched, leaving the seam’s edge exposed on the inside. Using an overlock stitch is a much easier construction method, and since most sew houses can do it, the cost is (usually) reflected in the affordable price.

The downside is some overlock stitches are unfinished. Left exposed, they can rub against the body, snag, and fray, which eventually will pull on the surrounding stitching.

Faherty’s flannel is entirely constructed with exposed overlocked stitching. We feel it has merits in comfort, styling, and materials that help compensate for the seam construction.

A good compromise is to flatlock the overstitching. It doesn’t hide the seams, but at least the overstitching is tacked down out of the way. This makes the seams less bulky than fully felled seams and costs less to sew. More importantly, it’s much more comfortable and practical when joining heavy-weight fabrics that creep over 300 g/m². Devium, Pladra, Anian, and MuskOx overstitched their flatlocked seams in the arm pits.

When buying a shirt, look at the construction details. A well-constructed shirt will cost more in the short term but will last for years.

While flannel is often plaid, they are available in solids too; (photo/Steve Graepel)

FAQ

What is flannel?

Traditionally a brushed twill made from wool, the original flannel was woven to keep Welsh sheep herders warm while tending the flock on temperamental winter days. Nowadays, the term flannel has expanded into cotton, synthetic, hemp, and blends with stretchy fibers. What unequivocally defines flannel is the brushed surface that lofts the yarns into a heat-trapping nap that gives it that super soft feel to the touch.

True flannels start from twill — a diagonal pattern like you find in jeans. Either the front or back can be brushed, giving it a soft insulating nap. To give a flannel that lofty fluffy feeling, a metal brush works the material’s surface, mechanically teasing the fibers until lofted into that fuzzy surface that traps air.

What flannels are most durable?

Flannel is achieved by brushing the fabric to tease fibers out, which act like an insulator. The rub is it can compromise durability. In short, the fibers are broken and become more prone to catching dust and grime, which can continue to break down the fibers. Contrastingly, lightly brushed flannels tend to be more durable. They don’t collect as much grime or catch as easily on wood splinters or metal edges.

Flannel comes in all forms these days. It’s unfair to box a shirt in or out of the flannel club. It might help to think of the base material sitting on a brush scale. At the far end is a smooth-faced, durable shirt. On the other is a soft and plush shirt.

Our top pick from MuskOX is a buttery soft flannel made from 300 g/m² organic cotton. The shirt is brushed on both sides and exudes flannel. The fabric is so thick that it will retain durability year after year. For mid-weight flannels, lightly brushed fabrics, like found in Devium’s Boca or Roark’s Diablo will serve as better work shirts over, say Faherty’s Legend, which brushes loosely woven yarns.

What is the difference between flannel and plaid?

Flannel is a lofted fabric–regardless of the pattern. That fabric can come in a variety of solids and patterns, including the cross-hatched patterns, originally dating back to the Scottish culture to distinguish families and clans, we call plaid.

How do I choose a flannel?

Start with how and where you want to use it. If you intend to wear your flannel outside or as a jacket, consider a wool or insulated flannel. ANIAN’s wool Berlino is great at blocking wind and light rain. But the pockets are small. We liked Devium’s front pockets and the low nap is very durable, but the cotton flannel is best worn on cool, dry days. Good Man’s Stadium flannel is great for around town but lacks durability for hardwearing tasks.

We love Patagonia’s Fjord flannel for its overall softness, quality, and general easy-wearing approachability. For more active pursuits, we liked how Wellen’s synthetic Hazy wicks moisture, without compromising that plush feeling we yearn for. But neither are as durable as Roark’s nearly bulletproof synthetic flannel. It’s got a nice DWR and hard-tack surface, but it’s also the least plush shirt on our list.

Some work flannels, like those offered by Filson, can be oversized. We found the work-inspired Boca from Devium fit spot-on. In general, you will be happier if you try them on before you buy. If you can’t, it’s worth sizing down for a more tailored fit — especially when buying anything from Filson, which generally runs one size larger.

Like a tool in your toolbox, the best flannel will be the flannel that meets your needs. Take stock of how you want to use it, and then use our guide to find the best option for you.

What’s the warmest flannel?

The warmest shirt is the Pladra’s Fireside. The organic cotton fibers are fat and durable, with a low nap on the outside, its brushed in the inside to trap heat like down. Mountain Hardwear’s 300 g/m² Plusher is a good budget option for those who want a warm shirt that can also work as an overshirt.

Neither are as thick (or durable) as ANIAN’s Berlino wool, but the Fireside and Plusher wear more streamlined, whereas the Berlino fits more like an overshirt. If you want to stay warm in wet weather, reach for wool or synthetic, and that’s where the Berlino shines.

What’s the most comfortable flannel?

We loved the Good Man Stadium flannel for its über-soft feeling, both inside and out. It became the benchmark to test all other flannels for softness.

If you want a more heavyweight-hitting flannel, but don’t want to compromise softness, Pladra’s Fireside is a fantastic choice. While the outside isn’t brushed, the material is softer than a lot of other work-inspired shirts but still is inherently durable. For comfort against the skin, they brushed the inside to perfection.

A deviation from true brushed twill flannel, we also liked the woven Legend Sweater from Faherty. While the seams are overstitched, the material is super comfortable against the skin. The benefit of comfort comes at the cost of durability. The loose weave tends to pull easily so it is best suited for casual wear.

How long do flannels last?

How long a shirt lasts is a combination of materials, construction, and use.

If taken care of, quality materials sewn together with flat seams will last for years. MuskOx, Patagonia, Devium, Roark, Duluth, and even the stylishly tailored Fireside from Pladra are all highly durable shirts. Any of these shirts are solidly constructed and will serve you well.

How often should I wash my flannel shirt?

How often you wash it depends on how you wear it. If you wear it daily as an overshirt, where you aren’t sweating directly against the fabric, you can get by with a few wears before you wash it. If you work out in it or are putting it to task with a shovel on a pile of dirt, you should wash your shirt.

Follow the instructions on the garment. While synthetics can be washed and dried on low, we recommend air-drying cotton shirts. They can shrink.

Wool shirts might need special care, like dry-cleaning. Never dry a wool shirt in the drier. The fibers can shrink significantly making it essentially unwearable.

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