Home > Footwear

The Best Work Boots of 2024

Manual labor can be hard on the feet. We've narrowed down the best work boots to help you tread carefully in dangerous work environments, and also stand comfortably on hard surfaces for hours at a time.

Best Work Boots Review & Guide
Support us! GearJunkie may earn a small commission from affiliate links in this article. Learn More

Manual labor can be hard on the feet. We’ve narrowed down the best work boots to help you tread carefully in dangerous work environments, and also stand comfortably on hard surfaces for hours at a time.

Like any tool, there’s a right boot for the job. While most of us will sacrifice comfort for safety and function, bulky and stiff work boots can lead to chronic pain. Overall, the best work boots should balance the competing priorities of comfort and utility.

Even if you’re careful, heavy materials can unexpectedly fall and crush a foot. When that happens, the only thing that sits between you and workmen’s comp is a work boot. Finding the proper footwear is a step toward a long and healthy career.

Based in the Gunnison Valley of Colorado, lead author and boot tester Constance Mahoney was raised as a fifth-generation hunter and rancher. Mahoney and her husband live a life that demands a lot from footwear. They manage property, work seasonal jobs, hunt, fly fish, and frequently venture out into the mud and snow. Every boot on this list has been submitted to careful examination and real-world scrutiny.

We’ve categorized boots into steel-toe, safety-toe, and soft-toe varieties. To better evaluate each boot’s utility, we rated each on a “utility scale,” measuring a boot’s casual wearability against its utility.

From weekend chore masters to heavy-duty diesel drivers, here are the best work boots of 2024. To help you find the best work boot for your needs, we’ve included a buyer’s guide, a frequently asked questions section, and a comparison chart.

Editor’s Note: Fresh for spring, this guide received an update on April 29, 2024, adding the Carhartt Waterproof 6″ MOC Steel Toe Wedge. We also conducted a complete re-evaluation of the Caterpillar Alaska 2.0 to ensure it still stands up to the competition after a few seasons at the top of our list. Spoiler alert: It’s still number one!

The Best Work Boots of 2024


Best Overall Work Boots

Caterpillar Alaska 2.0

Specs

  • Utility-scale 85% utility, 15% casual; best for outdoor-heavy use, but nimble enough for indoor work as well
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe Yes
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety certifications ASTM F2892-18 rated to protect against open circuits up to 600 V in dry conditions
  • Weight per boot 2 lbs., 3.1 oz. (size 12)
Product Badge The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Durable outsole and upper
  • Breathable
  • Accurate sizing
  • Good value

Cons

  • Low-quality included laces
Best Budget Work Boots

Caterpillar Second Shift

Specs

  • Utility scale 80% utility, 20% casual
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe Yes
  • Electrical Hazard protection and other safety certifications Yes, this boot protects the wearer against open circuits up to 600 V in dry conditions (ASTM F2413-18)
  • Weight per boot 2 lbs., 2.5 oz. (size 12)
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Great value
  • Durable, high quality leather upper
  • Solid breathability and comfort

Cons

  • Advertised as waterproof, but tend to soak through easily
Best Safety-Toe Work Boots

KEEN Utility Chicago 6-Inch Waterproof With Carbon Toe

Specs

  • Utility-scale 75% utility, 25% casual; best for all-around, mid-duty work
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe Yes
  • Electric hazard protection and other safety certifications Yes, ASTM F2892-18 rated to protect against open circuits up to 600 V in dry conditions
  • Weight per boot 1 lb. 9 oz.
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • Great energy return
  • Supportive

Cons

  • Break-in period is required to avoid hot spots
Best Soft-Toe Work Boots

Thorogood American Heritage 6-Inch Moc Toe

Specs

  • Utility-scale 50% utility, 50% casual; best for indoor warehouse work or carpentry
  • Waterproof No
  • Steel toe No
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety certifications Electric shock-resisting soles and heels capable of withstanding an application of 18,000 V
  • Weight per boot 1 lb. 12 oz. (size 12)
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Sleek vintage look
  • Durable
  • Comfortable after long periods on your feet

Cons

  • Not waterproof
  • Not the most protective
Best Total Foot Protection Work Boots

Danner Steel Yard

Specs

  • Utility-scale 100% utility indoor/outdoor work, heavy-duty work where total foot protection is necessary
  • Waterproof No
  • Steel toe Yes, with metatarsal guard
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety certifications Yes, ASTM F2413-18 I/75 C/75 Mt/75 EH
  • Weight per boot 2.25 lbs. (size 12)
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Top-notch protection
  • Metatarsal shield protects against top-of-the-foot impacts
  • Durable
  • Comfortable

Cons

  • Limited flexibility
  • Heavy
Most Comfortable Work Boots

BOGS Bedrock II 6″ WP

Specs

  • Utility-scale 75% utility / 25% casual; outdoor work, all-around work
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe No
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety certifications Yes, F2413-11 / M I/75 C/75
  • Weight per boot 2 lbs. (size 12)
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Uncommonly comfortable
  • Minimal break-in required
  • Perfect for wide feet

Cons

  • Not the most supportive around the ankle joint
Best Insulated Work Boots

Muck Arctic Pro Steel Toe Boot

Specs

  • Utility Scale 80% utility, 20% casual; best for heavy-duty winter work
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe Yes
  • Electric hazard protection and other safety certifications Yes, F2413-11 M I/75 C/75 EH
  • Weight per boot 2.2 lbs. (size 12)
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Ideal for cold conditions and deep snow
  • Warm
  • Good traction in snow and muck

Cons

  • Only available in whole sizes
Best Pull-On Work Boots

Kodiak McKinney

Specs

  • Utility scale 70% utility, 30% casual; indoor/outdoor work, all-around work
  • Waterproof Leather is waterproof but elastic stretch panels are not
  • Steel toe No, composite toe
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety certification Yes, F2413 I/75 C/75 EH PR
  • Weight per boot 2 lbs. (size 12)
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Nice-looking
  • More work-capable than most other Chelsea-style boots

Cons

  • Runs large
  • Not ideal for wet conditions or deep snow
Best of the Rest

Carhartt Waterproof 6″ MOC Steel Toe Wedge

Specs

  • Utility-scale 80% utility, 20% casual; best for indoor work that needs additional toe protection
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe Yes
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety considerations Secondary protection against incidental contact with electrical circuits of 18,000 volts or less under dry conditions; Meets ASTM F2413-18 EH standards
  • Weight per boot 1.7 lbs., (size 8)
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Durable
  • Waterproof
  • Breathable

Cons

  • Long break-in period
  • Lugs are not aggressive

Kenetrek Hardscrabble ST

Specs

  • Utility-scale 80% utility, 20% casual; best for heavy-duty work, though light enough for moderate work
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe Yes
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety certifications Yes, ASTM F2412-11 and ASTM F2413-11 impact, compression and electrical hazard safety standards
  • Weight per boot 1.9 lbs.
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Excellent ankle support
  • Ideal for mud, snow, and loose outdoor surfaces
  • Durable

Cons

  • Requires some break-in

Timberland PRO Boondock 6-Inch Comp Toe

Specs

  • Utility-scale 80% utility, 20% casual; best for heavy-duty work, though light enough for moderate work
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe No, composite toe
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety considerations Yes, electrical hazard protection meets F2412-11, F2413-11, and F2892-11
  • Weight per boot 2.2 lbs.
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Plentiful structural support
  • Durable
  • Quite warm for a non-insulated work boot

Cons

  • On the heavier side, especially for a boot without a steel toe

Danner Vicious

Specs

  • Utility-scale 80% utility, 20% casual; indoor/outdoor work, all-around work
  • Waterproof Yes
  • Steel toe No, options include plain, composite, or floating PU metatarsal guard
  • Electrical hazard protection and other safety certifications Yes, ASTM F2892-1
  • Weight per boot Varies based on options; 1.2 to 2.2 lbs.
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Minimal break-in required
  • Effective waterproofing

Cons

  • On the pricey side

Red Wing Iron Ranger — Men’s & Women’s

Specs

  • Utility-scale 25% utility, 75% casual; capable of light-duty shop work, but lack of safety toe makes this better off the shop floor
  • Waterproof No
  • Steel toe No
  • Electrical hazard protection (and other safety certifications) N/A
  • Weight per boot 1.8 lbs.
The Best Work Boots of 2024

Pros

  • Top-notch build quality
  • Made in America
  • Elegant styling
  • Doubles as a dress boot
  • Durable

Cons

  • Not ideal for heavy duty work
  • Expensive

Best Work Boots Comparison Chart

Work BootsPriceWaterproofSteel ToeElectrical hazard protection and other safety certificationsWeight per boot
Caterpillar Alaska 2.0$135YesYesASTM F2892-18 rated to protect against open circuits up to 600 V in dry conditions2 lbs., 3.1 oz. (size 12)
Caterpillar Second Shift$115YesYesYes, this boot protects the wearer against open circuits up to 600 V in dry conditions (ASTM F2413-18)2 lbs., 2.5 oz. (size 12)
KEEN Utility Chicago$170YesYesYes, ASTM F2892-18 rated to protect against open circuits up to 600 V in dry conditions1 lb. 9 oz.
Thorogood American Heritage$250NoAvailable as an optionElectric shock-resisting soles and heels capable of withstanding an application of 18,000 V1 lb. 12 oz. (size 12)
Danner Steel Yard$200NoYes, with metatarsal guardYes, ASTM F2413-18 I/75 C/75 Mt/75 EH2.25 lbs. (size 12)
BOGS Bedrock II 6″ WP$170YesNoYes, F2413-11 / M I/75 C/752 lbs. (size 12) 
Muck Arctic Pro$215YesYesYes, F2413-11 M I/75 C/75 EH2.2 lbs. (size 12)
Kodiak McKinney$180Leather is waterproof but elastic stretch panels are notNo, composite toeYes, F2413 I/75 C/75 EH PR2 lbs. (size 12)
Carhartt Waterproof 6″ MOC Steel Toe Wedge$175 Yes YesSecondary protection against incidental contact with electrical circuits of 18,000 volts or less under dry conditions; Meets ASTM F2413-18 EH standards1.7 lbs., (size 8)
Kenetrek Hardscrabble ST$470YesYesYes, ASTM F2412-11 and ASTM F2413-11 impact, compression and electrical hazard safety standards1.9 lbs.
Timberland PRO Boondock$200YesNo, composite toeYes, electrical hazard protection meets F2412-11, F2413-11, and F2892-112.2 lbs.
Danner Vicious$220YesNo, though toe protection options existYes, ASTM F2892-1Varies based on options; 1.2 to 2.2 lbs.
Red Wing Iron Ranger$350NoNoN/A1.8 lbs.
Our testers put dozens of boots through the wringer — indoors and out; (photo/Conni Mahoney)

How We Tested the Best Work Boots

The GearJunkie team does not shy away from manual work. Our crew is used to being on their feet for hours in all different weather and working conditions. Safety is a priority, and work boots are critical.

Boots that are ill-fitting or not made to a certain standard can be dangerous and put your feet and sometimes your life in danger. That is why it is so important for us to list all of the safety ratings for the boots in this guide.

Lead author Constance Mahoney grew up on a cattle ranch in Montana. She is no stranger to long days on her feet in all weather conditions. She understands the importance of having the right boot for the job and thinks work boots are just as important as the tools she works with. Quality matters.

Constance’s husband, Taylor, has been working in the trades since 2006, and is on-site 5 days a week putting the gear he’s wearing to the real test. He is also a licensed chiropractor trained in biomechanics, gait, and orthotics, giving him a unique perspective on how work boots should support, fit, and flex.

Some of the boots in our selection are versatile enough to hike in, but if you’re looking to get into the woods after you’ve clocked out, check out GearJunkie’s guide to the best hiking boots and the best boots for hunting.

The  Caterpillar Alaska 2.0 is our overall favorite workboot; (photo/Conni Mahoney)

Buyer’s Guide: How to Choose the Best Work Boots

Soles

Of course, a work boot should protect your feet, but the unsung task of the work boot is to enable you to work hour after hour, day after day.

If the boot isn’t working, your legs, hips, back, and neck will compensate and eventually take the brunt (and do so with less grace). Above all else, a work boot’s task is to address stress at the ground level. A comfortable boot is arguably a safer boot. You’ll be more sure-footed and focused on the task at hand in a comfortable boot.

The outsole is where the rubber meets the road. Riding over the cushiony midsole and in direct contact with the ground, the outsole is about grip and protection.

Many boots use special formulas of urethane compounds that strike a balance of flexibility, durability, and increased traction on slick surfaces. If you work in shops where oils occasionally spill on the floor, look for shoes that specifically indicate oil and slip resistance. The best of the best are certified to meet SRC slip-resistance standards.

For standing all day on concrete, we prefer the simple wedge-shaped sole. Unlike a heeled boot, the sole has full contact with the ground. This helps absorb the shock with every step and disperses forces equally across the sole. A full-contact outsole also adds a little extra traction and, hence, is often a preferred sole for those working on slick surfaces.

When you think of the wedge sole, you immediately think of the classic moc-toe boot. We listed Thorogood’s American Heritage 6-inch moc toe MAXwear Wedge as our preferred soft-toe boot. But if your shoes are resoleable, a wedge sole can be added to any work boot regardless of the toe type.

If you’re standing all day on cement, like working the floor at Costco, a wedge-shaped sole should be on your list. Or, if your work brings you outside, look for a hiker-like tread that provides more traction in dirt and mud.

Sitting opposite the wedge sole is the heeled boot. The raised cowboy-style heel shifts your center of gravity slightly forward. These boots can be extremely durable and stable. But that gap between the heel and under the ball of the foot doesn’t give the foot full contact with the ground.

Because of this, they can feel a little squirrelly on slick ground. But they seat well with climbing spurs and have added ankle stability while climbing. Hence, you’ll often find taller heels on logger-style boots.

Sturdy outsoles with deep tread is crucial for loose and uneven surfaces; (photo/Conni Mahoney)

Soles can be cemented or welted to the boot. Cemented boots are lighter, more flexible, and arguably more comfortable out of the box. But once the sole wears out, shoes with cemented outsoles are irreparable.

A Goodyear welt can be resoled several times, increasing the life of your purchase. The outsole welt is sewn to the bottom of the shoe, enabling boots to be sewn and re-sewn multiple times. The shoe won’t be as comfortable underfoot as a boot cemented to an EVA midsole, but the durability and support are reasonable trade-offs. Over time, slipping into a Goodyear-welted boot will feel wonderfully comfortable.

Need more support? Consider an aftermarket insole. Available in a variety of thicknesses and cushion levels, Superfeet orthotics add a touch of personalized support to your boot. We particularly recommend an aftermarket insole for boots that lack a midsole.

Weatherproof

Dry feet are warm feet. If you’re working in truly wet conditions — like pulling crab pots off the Aleutian Islands — look for 100% waterproof boots. If it’s both wet and cold, upgrade to a thicker neoprene shell like Muck Boot’s fleece-lined Arctic Pro. It’s both 100% waterproof and rated down to -60 degrees F.

Other boots, like the BOGS Bedrock, use waterproof leather. In addition to waterproof leather, Timberland’s Boondocks and Kenetrek Hardscrabble ST boots add a waterproof-breathable membrane to keep moisture out. These membranes allow boots to be both waterproof and breathable.

Insulation

If you’ll be working outside in cold climates, opt for an insulated boot; (photo/Conni Mahoney)

Cold-weather boots include a thermal footbed and insulation in the shaft. The insulation is listed in the fabric’s weight per yard in grams. The higher the gram count, the warmer the boot is.

For cold job sites, we recommend boots with no less than 200 grams of insulation in the liner (with 400 grams the preferred winter standard). Muck Boot’s Arctic Pro has a fat neoprene outer lined with fleece.

If winter work boots have a safety toe, look for boots with insulation around the cap (or composite cap). This reduces the conductive effects of heat transfer from the toes to the safety toe.

High-vis accents are also great, especially if your work starts and ends in the dark or if you’re working roadside.

Toe Protection

Reliable toe protection is essential when working with heavy loads and other possible hazards; (photo/Conni Mahoney)

When he was younger, our lead tester’s dad worked on a farm that still plowed the fields with steel-wheeled tractors. Long story short, he now has nine toes. The importance of protective boots can’t be overlooked.

“Safety boots” are boots that have a protective cap that covers the phalanges (your actual toes). The cap resists compression, puncture, and impact forces.

Steel toe versus safety toe: What’s the difference? All steel-toe boots are considered safety-toe boots. Safety-toe boots are available in composites, alloys, Kevlar, and hard plastics. Steel is more durable and is considered the gold standard on many job sites. But they can conduct cold, heat, and electricity. Our top pick for a steel-toe boot is the Caterpillar Alaska 2.0 steel-toe boot. The Caterpillar (CAT) Second Shift steel-toe work boot is a great budget-friendly option.

Composites still meet the compression and impact safety standards, but they may only be able to sustain one of these impacts. On the flip side, composite-toe boots are lighter and won’t conduct currents. If you need toe protection on cold-weather job sites or work with high-voltage equipment, consider buying a non-metallic safety toe boot like the Perkins boot. Or if you are looking for an office boot with a composite toe, check out Kodiak’s McKinney Chelsea.

Nineteen of the foot’s 26 bones sit under the tongue and vamp of a shoe. The five bones that connect the toes to the ankle and form the arch of the foot are your metatarsals. Some boots like the Danner Steel Yard come with an additional protective “met-guard” that lies over the laces, protecting the metatarsals.

ASTM Safety Standards

Work boots come with a variety of certifications based on pre-determined safety standards; (photo/Conni Mahoney)

Protection is what elevates a boot from a supportive hiker to an industry heavy-hitter. Standards provide confidence in the boot’s ability to perform under specific stressors.

If you poke around work boots enough, you’ll likely come across safety ratings set by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM). These are international standards that identify the minimal requirements for protective footwear on the job site. They rate everything from viral penetration to puncture resistance to compression ratings.

ASTM-F2413 standards rate boots specifically for compression, impact, metatarsal, conductive properties, electrical hazards, static dissipation, and puncture. Here are some typical ASTM abbreviations:

  • I for Impact
  • C for Compression
  • Mt for Metatarsal
  • Cd for Conductive
  • EH for Electrical Hazard
  • SD for Static Dissipating
  • PR for Puncture Resistant
  • CS Chain Saw cut resistance
  • DI for Dielectric insulation — insulation from circuits or conductors

Each is followed by a number. To find how your prospective boot rates, the ASTM standards are outlined in four lines:

  • Line 1: Compliance and year
  • Line 2: Gender/impact/compression/metatarsal resistance
  • Line 3-4: Specific hazards the boot protects against

So if we interpret the Timberland Boondock, we get the following:

  • ASTM F2413-11: Complies with the performance requirement of F2413, issued in 2011
  • M/I/75C/75: A men’s boot that complies with the impact and compression requirements of a 50-pound weight dropped from 18 inches, delivering 75 foot-pounds of force on the toe, and can endure 2,500 pounds of rolling force over the toe

EH: Outsole is made from non-conductive materials that are shock-resistant

Buying Your Work Boots

Folks working in wet and snowy environments should seek out reliably waterproof work boots; (photo/Conni Mahoney)

Which boot is best for you? If you’re puttering around the house on weekends, choose a comfortable boot with appropriate protection for your daily tasks.

Unless you’re Clark Griswold, you probably don’t need a heavy-duty, steel-toe boot to hang Christmas lights. You’d be better served with a comfortable, supportive boot with traction like the Danner Vicious. If you want something more stylish that pairs well with suites and shop work, look at the American-made Red Wing’s Iron Ranger. However, if you’re splitting wood or mowing the lawn, it’s not a bad idea to consider a safety toe for protection.

Many jobs will explicitly share which footwear meets required ASTM standards before you can step foot on the site. Neglecting to follow them can incur large fines from OSHA. Getting injured while deciding not to wear protective boots on the job can affect your workmen’s comp and insurance. If you’re unsure, ask your boss what standards your boots need to comply with.

You can buy any of these boots online. And some manufacturers, like White’s, will only build a boot off of your mailed measurements. But for most boots, it’s best to try them on at a local shop. A boot’s last can be different than your street shoe. A shop can measure your feet and ensure you’re stepping into a proper-fitting boot.

Try boots on at the end of the day, preferably after work. Your feet swell over a day’s work, and trying on shoes after your shift will provide a better gauge of a proper fit.

When you try on ski boots, you bring ski socks. The same goes for work boots. Bring a pair of socks you intend to wear with the boots. Better yet, buy yourself a new pair of socks; they wear out quicker than you think. Plus, nobody wants to try on shoes with socks pulled from the shop’s community bin.

Keep in mind that a stiff, durable pair of work boots may take a few weeks to break in;(photo/Conni Mahoney)

Take care of your boots. Invest in a good horsehair brush to regularly dust off dirt and grime. Clean your boots with warm water. Leather is like your skin and needs moisturizing. Condition your leather boots after every wash.

Your boots are tools, so periodically check them for wear and tear. Treat the safety toe like a helmet. If a composite toe has taken a hit, it’s probably best to retire the boots. If the boot has a Goodyear welt, uneven wear on the sole’s heel, or any splitting from the boot, it’s a good indication it’s time to resole.

Work boots can be expensive, but they’re part and parcel of your health and wage. Buy wisely, and they should serve you well for years to come.

FAQ

There are all sorts of work boots geared toward a variety of tasks — it’s wise to shop around according to your unique needs; (photo/Conni Mahoney)
What are the most comfortable work boots?

We found that the BOGS Bedrock II 6″ WP is the most comfortable work boot on the market for most foot shapes. However, if possible, go to a store after your shift is done and try on different boots to see what feels more comfortable to you.

What are the best work boots you can buy?

The best work boot you can buy will be the one that matches the safety ratings you need and one that you can wear repeatedly for hours on end. Everyone’s specifics will differ but the KEEN Utility Chicago 6-inch waterproof with carbon toe — Men’s & Women’s —  and the Kenetrek Hardscrabble ST were two of the best overall boots we tried.

What is a MOC toe?

A MOC toe is a style of boot that has a seam running around the top edge of the toe. The Thorogood American Heritage 6-inch moc toe is a prime example of this.

Why do my work boots hurt my feet?

Work boots that hurt your feet generally do not provide the correct support, or they do not fit correctly. Finding the correct boots for your feet is important, and generally, the more money you spend on a work boot, the more comfort and support you will get. Follow our buyer’s guide above to help make a comfortable choice.

How do I choose the right work boots?

Everyone’s feet are different, so finding the correct boot for your feet is important. Here are some tips to lead you to the right boot when you go out boot shopping. If you need more info on how to choose the right boot, check out GearJunkie’s boot-buying tips.

  • Decide what features you are looking for to help guide you to a specific style of boot. Some examples of boot features are as follows: waterproof, steel or safety toe, electrical shock-resistant, slip-on versus lace-up, boot height, etc.
  • Test the boots for length and width. Not every company sizes its boots the same. Some are longer or shorter, and boot width can vary significantly, especially when it comes to safety/steel-toe boots. We have found discrepancies of up to a full boot size between different brands we tried, so you can’t always rely on the size that’s on the tag. Make sure to try them on before buying them, or if ordering online, make sure you can return them if the fit is incorrect.
  • Make sure that the boots flex well and in the right location. Boots should flex at the ball of your foot, not at your arch. If the boot flexes too far back it will lead to foot fatigue due to lack of support. Looking for boots that say they have a “shank“ can help, as this adds support and only allows the boot to flex where it should flex.
  • Make sure that the laces hold your foot in place. If you cannot get the boot to the correct tightness, it will allow your foot to move too much, causing blistering or irritation.
  • Wear the same socks you wear on the job while trying on boots. Wool/synthetic blends will keep your feet more comfortable than cotton during a long workday.

Try on boots at the end of the workday. Your feet change shape throughout the day so trying on boots at the end of the day when your feet have swollen, widened, and flattened will allow for a much better fit that won’t have your feet hurting at the end of a long day.

Subscribe Now

Get adventure news and gear reviews in your inbox!

Join Our GearJunkie Newsletter

Get adventure news and gear reviews in your inbox!