Front Runner Slimpro Van Rack
(Photo/Front Runner)

Front Runner Slimpro Van Rack: The Ultra-Configurable Roof Rack for Just About Any Van

Need a roof rack but are frustrated by that roof-mounted AC? Front Runner’s Slimpro Van Rack’s configurable design is the sliding solution you’re looking for.

Front Runner has just launched a new configurable van roof rack, one that’s slim but sturdy. It offers a modular design that lets you change up your rack for weekday work and weekend play. The rack lets you customize fitment to make sure that your rack works with your van. Ideal for campervans with roof-mount fixtures like AC.

Lightweight Rack, Heavy-Duty Work

Front Runner Slimpro Van Rack
(Photo/Front Runner)

The Front Runner Slimpro Van Roof Rack starts with all-aluminum construction. That makes it 30% lighter than a steel rack without sacrificing strength and improving durability.

A lighter rack maximizes the weight of cargo you can store on the roof when you’re loaded. When you’re not loaded, it can help make your van more stable on the road and even boost fuel economy compared with a hefty steel rack.

An adjustable foot rail lets the rack fit on multiple van roofs, so a van upgrade doesn’t have to mean a new rack. Once in place, it’s the adjustable slat system that gives the rack much of its configurability.

Moving the adjustable slats fore and aft lets you configure the roof rack to fit around roof fixtures like HVAC units, skylights, and vents. They’re adjusted using T-slots in the side rails along with locating holes to make configuration quick and easy.

Dozens of Available Accessories

Front Runner Slimpro Van Rack
(Photo/Front Runner)

T-slots in the crossbar slats make mounting accessories quick and easy. Front Runner offers more than 55 accessories designed to fit in the slots, including spare tire carriers, cargo tie-downs, bike carriers, board carriers, kayak carriers, and more.

Light bars and basket-style Expedition Rails are available, as is a roll-up canopy. If you can think of something to store, Front Runner probably has the accessory you need.

Rack Works for Work, Too

Front Runner Slimpro Van Rack
(Photo/Front Runner)

Front Runner says the Slimpro Van Roof Rack can be configured for professional use for those using their vans during the workday. Carrying building materials like pipes, poles, ladders, and other cargo that you need to do the work that lets you go adventuring on the weekend.

It can hold plenty of gear, even you climbing around to load and unload. But when the rack is empty, the slim profile means it’s barely visible — a plus for aerodynamics as well as aesthetics.

The Slimpro Van Roof Rack is available for most of the popular full-size vans, including the Mercedes-Benz Sprinter, Ford Transit, and Ram ProMaster. Front Runner offers a limited lifetime warranty on the rack as well.

Front Runner Slimpro Van Rack Pricing

Front Runner Slimpro Van Rack
(Photo/Front Runner)

The racks are available now through the Front Runner online store or any official dealer. MSRP ranges from $1,105 to $2,135, dependent on the length of your van. Not cheap, but for a configurable aluminum rack with a rock-solid warranty it’s definitely reasonable. Front Runner calls it “a price point that doesn’t sacrifice quality.”

Longer vans get more mounting feet and more crossbar slats. Up to 10 for extended-length vans, as few as six for shorties like the Ford Transit 130-inch. The mounting feet are designed to fit the factory mount points, making sure mounting and loading are secure. Rack weights range from around 60 pounds to 100 pounds depending on size.

Of course, that price is before accessories, and it’s easy to find a few dozen you’ll need and want.

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Evan Williams
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Evan has been drooling over cars since the time he learned to walk. Since then he's worked on controlling the drooling and expanded his interests to include hiking, cycling, and kayaking. He went to school for engineering but transitioned into a more satisfying career and has been writing automotive and outdoors news for nearly a decade