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A Big Year for Utah Fishermen: 11 State Records Set in 2022

Utah fishing recordRyan Peterson caught his record-breaking non-native cutthroat trout June 4 at Fish Lake. The fish was 3 pounds 14 ounces, 22½ inches long and had an 11-inch girth; (photo/Utah Division of Wildlife Resources)
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Fishermen caught record-breaking fish in several categories, including catch-and-release, catch-and-keep, and spearfishing, wildlife officials said this week.

The big-fish stories of 10 Utah anglers just went official. Of the state’s 68 fishing records, 11 now have new holders and bigger fish, the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources (DWR) announced this week.

One of the successful fishermen, Eli Gourdin, actually broke two records this year. He caught and released a 25-inch Bonneville cutthroat trout in Lost Creek Reservoir and a 22-inch Colorado River cutthroat trout in Currant Creek Reservoir.

By comparison, fishermen broke just four statewide fishing records in Utah in 2021. Another 11 records fell in 2020, and anglers caught five record-breaking fish in 2019, the DWR said.

“The primary reason that the DWR tracks record fish is to provide anglers with recognition of their achievements,” DWR Aquatics Assistant Chief Craig Walker said. “The public records are also a fun way to encourage anglers to get out on the water and hopefully encounter some of the large fish Utah has to offer.”

2022 Utah Catch-and-Release Records

  • Black bullhead: Set by Taylor Hadlock on July 19 at Quail Creek Reservoir. The fish was 16 inches long.
  • Black crappie: Set by Draygen Picklesimer on April 18 at Quail Creek Reservoir. The fish was 16¾ inches long.
  • White crappie: Set by Taylor Shamo Feb. 9 at Gunnison Bend Reservoir. The fish was 12⅞ inches long.
  • Bonneville cutthroat trout: Set by Eli Gourdin on April 18 at Lost Creek Reservoir. The fish was 25¼ inches long.
  • Colorado River cutthroat trout: Set by Eli Gourdin on March 25 at Currant Creek Reservoir. The fish was 22 inches long.
  • Tiger trout: Set by David MacKay on May 6 at Fish Lake. The fish was 29¼ inches long.
  • Walleye: Set by Jon Torrence on April 15 at Utah Lake. The fish was 33 inches long.
Utah fishing record
Willie G. Carollo caught a record-breaking Bonneville cutthroat trout for the catch-and-keep record on July 17 at Lost Creek Reservoir. The new record fish was 10 pounds, 2.24 ounces, 28 inches long, and had a 17.5-inch girth; (photo/Utah Division of Wildlife Resources)

2022 Utah Catch-and-Keep Records

  • Bonneville cutthroat trout: Set by Bryan Olsen on April 18 at Lost Creek Reservoir with a 4-pound, 12-ounce fish that was 24¼ inches long. However, that record was then broken by Willie G. Carollo on July 17, also at Lost Creek Reservoir. The new record fish was 10 pounds 2.24 ounces, 28 inches long, and had a 17.5-inch girth.
  • Wiper: Set by Hunter King on June 18 at Newcastle Reservoir. The fish was 16 pounds 8.32 ounces, 31 inches long, and had a 24-inch girth.
Utah fishing records
At left is the 16-inch black bullhead caught by Taylor Hadlock on July 19 at Quail Creek Reservoir. At right, the 33-inch Walleye caught by Jon Torrence on April 15 at Utah Lake; (photos/Utah Division of Wildlife Resources)

2022 Utah Spearfishing Records

  • Striped bass: Set by Darvil McBride on April 30 at Lake Powell. The fish was 6 pounds 3 ounces, 27¼ inches long, and had a 17-inch girth.
  • Non-native cutthroat trout: Set by Ryan Peterson on June 4 at Fish Lake. The fish was 3 pounds 14 ounces, 22½ inches long, and had an 11-inch girth.

Utah officials began tracking records for harvested fish in the early 1900s. You can view all the state fishing records on the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources’ website.

Do you think you’ve caught a record-breaking fish with your sweet fishing skills? You can also use the website above to find out the details for applying.

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