Spyder U.S. Ski Team Olympics 2022 Hero
Olympic Ski Team uniforms for Freeski (left) and Alpine (right) athletes; (photos/Spyder and Dragon Alliance).

Spyder Unveils US Ski Team Uniforms for 2022 Olympic Games

The adventure brand partnered with Dragon Alliance eyewear and artist Eric Haze to design the elite ski kits.

On Wednesday, Spyder revealed the red-white-and-blue uniforms that will adorn the U.S.’s Aerial, Alpine, Freeski, and Mogul skiers at the Winter Olympics in Beijing next month.

Renowned graphic artist Eric Haze handled the aesthetic aspects, which showcase his NYC street style. Bold lines and color blocking dominate the 2022 Winter Games line.

Here’s what Spyder’s custom kits have in store for the U.S. teams.

Spyder US Ski Team Uniforms

Aerial Ski Kit

U.S. Olympic Aerial uniform; (photos/Spyder)
U.S. Olympic Aerial uniform; (photos/Spyder)

Spyder says it optimized the Aerial team’s one-piece suits for symmetry and dexterity. Mock necks and sealed collar-to-waist zippers should offer minimal encumbrance and maximum protection from the elements.

The color pattern is an extension of the suit’s symmetry. A central blue column, thick white stripes down either side, and red color-blocked elbows set an already unusual uniform off even more.

Alpine Ski Kit

U.S. Olympic Alpine uniform; (photos/Spyder)
U.S. Olympic Alpine uniform; (photos/Spyder)

The Alpine ensemble emphasizes speed and protection. Discipline-specific aspects include a specially engineered woven shell, full-length sealed side zippers, and a widening back zipper for mobility.

The Alpine uniform’s color scheme is predominately gray and white with red and blue accents. It’s more modest than any of its counterparts — maybe that’s a nod to alpine skiing’s traditional European origins.

Freeski Ski Kit

U.S. Olympic Freeski uniform (photos/Spyder)
U.S. Olympic Freeski uniform; (photos/Spyder)

Spyder claims that it prioritized athlete individuality in designing the Freeski kit. Hoodies, jackets, and reversible vests are meant to give each skier enough room to express their style while maintaining uniformity.

The Freeski color scheme is a little bolder than its Alpine counterpart — blue-and-white color blocking and red accents flock the kit.

Mogul Ski Kit

U.S. Olympic Mogul uniform; (photos/Spyder)
U.S. Olympic Mogul uniform; (photos/Spyder)

For the mogul skiers, Spyder puts mobility and tradition up front with a redesigned anorak. Because mogul skiing is all about dexterity, the partially zippered jacket is meant to provide an uninhibited range of motion.

The Mogul color scheme pairs the blue jacket and white pants with red zippers and a distinct “USA” pocket graphic.

Spyder x Eric Haze Lifestyle Gear

If it wasn’t clear, you can’t get the ski team gear without being on the team. But you can get in on Spyder and Eric Haze’s line of fan gear.

Spyder mittens, scarves, trucker hats, windbreakers, hoodies, and even a bucket hat feature Haze’s loud, USA-centric designs. 

Spyder x Dragon Collab US Team Goggles

NFX Spyder Collab Snow Goggles feat. Eric Haze 2022 U.S. Ski Team band; (photo/Dragon Alliance)
NFX Spyder Collab Snow Goggles featuring an Eric Haze-designed band; (photo/Dragon Alliance)

To furnish the kit’s snow goggles, Spyder brought in Dragon Alliance eyewear. The result combines Spyder’s apparel expertise and Haze’s graphics with Dragon’s signature frameless lenses and patented Advanced Projects X (APX) technology. LumaLens color optimization, anti-fog coating, armored venting, and a bonus lens are par for the course.

And at $130 MSRP, the updated gogs should court plenty of buyers who want reputable goggles in the mid-to-lower price range. Four band designs — Eric Haze, Alex Hall, Dusty Rose, and Ebony — are available.

Grab a pair of NFX Spyder Collab Goggles, or learn more about Dragon’s specialized goggle technology.

group of skiers
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Jilli Cluff
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Jilli grew up in the rural southern Colorado mountains, later moving to Texas for college. After seven years in corporate consulting, she was introduced to sport climbing — and life would never be the same. She now works as a contributor, gear tester, and editor for GearJunkie and other outlets within the AllGear family. She is based out of Atlanta, Georgia where she takes up residence with her climbing gear and one-eared blue heeler, George Michael.