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The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Without the right pair of glasses, you may be left without the ability to see what you’re fishing for — in more ways than one.

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Fishing sunglasses protect your eyes from harmful UV rays that can cause permanent damage to your vision, but they also provide a shield from the sharp hook you’re flinging through the air. No one wants to catch a streamer in the eye.

Many factors go into a good pair of shades, but it truly comes down to quality lenses that are comfortable to wear. A good polarized lens allows you to peer through the water in ways the naked eye can’t. Technology has come so far, leaving anglers with nearly limitless lens options for every kind of fishing.

The lead author of this guide is Aaron King, a northern California-based competitive angler. Aaron spends most weekends casting into promising pockets of California’s best bass lakes. In addition to expertise on the water, Aaron is a self-described gear nut who never stops tinkering with his trolling rig and accessories. After testing dozens of sunglasses, this list contains the tried-and-true standouts.

Scroll down for our recommendations for the shades that will suit you well on the water. Check out our comprehensive Buyer’s Guide and Frequently Asked Questions sections for helpful tips, and have a look at our Comparison Chart to steer your decision-making.

Editor’s Note: We updated this Buyer’s Guide on March 29, 2024, by adding the Costa Del Mar King Tide Frames as our top pick, and ensuring all products are current and up-to-date.

The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024


Best Overall Fishing Sunglasses

Costa Del Mar King Tide Frames

Specs

  • Fit Wide – A larger lens front designed for those who prefer to cover a greater portion of the face. Available in 6 or 8-base
  • Frame Materials Nylon & Propionate
  • Lens Options Polarized glass. Many color options
  • Special Features Rx available, adjustable nose pads
Product Badge The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Versatile – can go from bar to boat with ease
  • Removable side-shields offer extra coverage
  • Lightweight and comfortable enough for all-day wear
  • Engineered to prevent fogging and manage sweat
  • Anti-skid coating keeps frames from sliding around on any surface

Cons

  • Lack of frame color options.
  • Shark gill venting is not an aesthetic for everyone, but it’s subtle
  • Pricey
Best Budget Fishing Sunglasses

Goodr Sunglasses

Specs

  • Fit Medium; a smaller to average-size head fits this frame
  • Frame material Triacetate cellulose
  • Lens options Polarized
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Simple
  • No slip
  • No bounce
  • Warranty

Cons

  • No lens options
  • TAC frame is not as durable
Runner-Up Best Fishing Sunglasses

Bajío Vega

Specs

  • Fit Large — 8-base curvature for greater wrap and side coverage
  • Frame material Bio-based nylon
  • Lens options Polarized glass and polarized polycarbonate available. Many color options
  • Special features Integrated leash compatibility, readers available
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Great lens technology
  • Versatile
  • Several lens options
  • Eco-conscious

Cons

  • Expensive
Best Lake Fishing Sunglasses

Smith Guide’s Choice

Specs

  • Fit Large — big lenses with a comfortable spring-assisted hinge for non-slip
  • Frame material Bio-based nylon
  • Lens options Polarized poly and glass with Chromapop — Many lens options
  • Special features Rx available, integrated leash compatibility, small and XL options are now available in the Guide’s Choice
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Premium quality
  • Integrated leash and hard case included
  • Great warranty
  • Versatile

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Can’t fully customize frame and lens color options
Best Wraparound Fishing Sunglasses

Maui Jim Makoa

Specs

  • Fit Medium / large
  • Frame Material Nylon
  • Lens Options PolarizedPlus2 Glass
  • Special Features RX available, slightly adjustable temple arms, spring hinges
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Premium quality
  • Hard case included
  • Great warranty

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Not many lens or frame options
Best Large-Frame Fishing Sunglasses

Bajío Stiltsville

Specs

  • Fit Extra large — generous lens coverage with an 8-base lens curvature for better side protection
  • Frame material Bio-based nylon
  • Lens options Polarized polycarbonate or polarized glass
  • Special features Superb lens clarity, flexible hinges
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Many lens options
  • Great lens coverage
  • Hard case included

Cons

  • Expensive
  • No integrated leash
Best of the Rest

Smith Boomtown

Specs

  • Fit Medium / large — Broad lens coverage with a lightweight frame. 6-base lens curvature
  • Frame Material Bio-based nylon
  • Lens Options Polarized Chromapop polycarbonate
  • Special Features Spring hinges
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Lightweight
  • "Active fit" — rarely slips
  • Great lens coverage

Cons

  • No included accessories

Bajío Cometa

Specs

  • Fit Medium; a medium lens with an 6-base curvature for a more open design and flat side coverage
  • Frame material Lightweight bio-based nylon material
  • Lens options Polarized glass and polarized polycarbonate available — many color options
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Classic style
  • Great lens technology
  • Several lens options
  • Eco-conscious

Cons

  • Expensive

Wiley X P-17

Specs

  • Fit Medium / large — fits the average angler well
  • Frame material Triloid nylon
  • Lens options Polarized
  • Special features Rx available, ANSI Z87.1+ lens impact safety standards, integrated leash compatible
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Tried and true
  • Affordable
  • Durable
  • Integrated leash included

Cons

  • Might be a bit small for larger faces

Fin-Nor Tilloo

Specs

  • Fit Medium — 6-base curvature with flatter-than-average coverage
  • Frame material Bioresin
  • Lens options Polarized glass and polarized polycarbonate
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024Photo/Fin Nor Sunglasses

Pros

  • Stylish
  • Comfortable
  • Non-slip

Cons

  • On the smaller side

Costa Del Mar Lido Sunglasses

Specs

  • Fit Large — designed to fit those with an average-sized head. 6-base curvature
  • Frame Material Bioresin
  • Lens Options Polarized glass and polarized polycarbonate
  • Special Features Rx available, adjustable nose pads
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Great clarity
  • Versatile
  • Lens options
  • Adjustable nose pads

Cons

  • Expensive
  • No integrated leash but Croakie compatible

Hobie Mojo Float

Specs

  • Fit Large — Generous lens coverage with an 8-base lens curvature
  • Frame material Low-density nylon polymer for buoyancy
  • Lens options Polarized polycarbonate
  • Special features It floats!
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Affordable
  • Durable
  • Lightweight
  • Floats
  • Good clarity
  • Case included

Cons

  • Not many lens options

Maui Jim Alenuihaha

Specs

  • Fit Medium/large — broad coverage with tighter wrapped 8-base curve
  • Frame material Nylon
  • Lens options PolarizedPlus2 Glass
  • Special features Rx available, spring hinges
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Premium quality
  • Hard case included
  • Great warranty

Cons

  • Expensive
  • Not many lens or frame options

Costa Del Mar Waterwoman 2

Specs

  • Fit Medium — Average coverage with open frame design
  • Frame Material Bioresin
  • Lens Options Polarized polycarbonate and polarized glass
  • Special Features Rx available
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Premium Quality
  • Unique Style

Cons

  • Expensive

Oakley Holbrook

Specs

  • Fit Medium / large — Average coverage with a flat 6-base curvature
  • Frame Material Lightweight nylon composite
  • Lens Options Polarized Prizm polycarbonate
  • Special Features Rx available
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Very versatile
  • Stylish
  • Many variations
  • Tried and true

Cons

  • No glass lens option

Gatorz Delta Polarized Sunglasses

Specs

  • Fit Large — excellent wrap and side coverage with an 8-base curvature
  • Frame Material Anodized aluminum
  • Lens Options Non-Polarized, polarized, OPZ (digital screen visibility), and ballistic (extra lens strength) — many color options
  • Special Features Rx available, adjustable nose pads and frame
The Best Fishing Sunglasses of 2024

Pros

  • Versatile
  • Several lens options
  • Durable
  • Lifetime Warranty
  • USA Made

Cons

  • Some anglers find the aluminum frame uncomfortable

Fishing Sunglasses Comparison Chart

SunglassesPriceFitFrame MaterialLens OptionsSpecial Features
Costa Del Mar King Tide Frames$329-$349Wide — A larger lens front designed for those who prefer to cover a greater portion of the face. Available in 6 or 8-baseNylon & PropionatePolarized glass. Many color optionsRx available, adjustable nose pads
Goodr Sunglasses$30Medium — ideal for smaller to average-sized headsTriacetate CellulosePolarizedN/A
Bajío Vega
$209-259Large — 8-base curvature for greater wrap and side coverageBio-based nylonPolarized glass and polarized polycarbonate available. Many color optionsIntegrated leash compatibility, readers available
Smith Guide’s Choice$215-289Large — big lenses with a comfortable spring-assisted hinge for non-slipBio-based nylonPolarized poly and glass with Chromapop. Many lens optionsRx available, integrated leash compatibility, small and XL options are now available in the Guide’s Choice
Maui Jim Makoa$279Medium / largeNylonPolarizedPlus2 GlassRX available, slightly adjustable temple arms, spring hinges
Bajío Stiltsville$259Extra large — generous lens coverage with an 8-base lens curvature for better side protectionBio-based nylonPolarized polycarbonate or polarized glassSuperb lens clarity, flexible hinges
Smith Boomtown$175-215Medium / large — broad lens coverage with a lightweight frame. 6-base lens curvatureBio-based nylonPolarized Chromapop polycarbonateSpring hinges
Bajío Cometa
$209-259Medium — 6-base curvature with an open design and flat side coverageLightweight Bio-Based NylonPolarized glass and polarized polycarbonate available. Many color optionsLAPIS technology cuts 95% of blur light.
Wiley X P-17
$185Medium / large — fits the average angler wellTriloid nylonPolarizedRx available, ANSI Z87.1+ lens impact safety standards, integrated leash compatible
Fin-Nor Tilloo
$209-259Medium — 6-base curvature with flatter-than-average coverageBioresinPolarized glass and polarized polycarbonateN/A
Hobie Mojo Float
$100Large — generous lens coverage with an 8-base lens curvatureLow-density nylon polymer for buoyancyPolarized polycarbonateIt floats!
Costa Del Mar Lido$197-224Large — designed to fit those with an average-sized head. 6-base curvatureBioresinPolarized glass and polarized polycarbonateRx available, adjustable nose pads
Maui Jim Alenuihaha
$279Medium / large — broad coverage with tighter wrapped 8-base curveNylonPolarizedPlus2 GlassRx available, spring hinges.
Costa Waterwoman 2
$204-284Medium — average coverage with open frame designBioresinPolarized polycarbonate and polarized glassRx available
Oakley Holbrook$157-217Medium / large — average coverage with a flat 6-base curvatureLightweight nylon compositePolarized Prizm polycarbonateRx available
Gatorz Delta Polarized Sunglasses
$215Large — excellent wrap and side coverage with an 8-base curvatureAluminumNon-Polarized, polarized, OPZ (digital screen visibility), and ballistic (extra lens strength). Many color optionsRx available. Adjustable nose pads and frame.
Posing with an absolute unit; (photo/Aaron King)

How We Tested Fishing Sunglasses

Just like most outdoorsy people, we live in sunglasses here at GearJunkie. No matter what kind of activity we’re doing we have a pair for the task.

Throughout our careers as outdoorsmen and outdoorswomen, we’ve learned a few things about what makes the right pair. Through rigorous and extensive on-the-water testing we narrowed down this list to some of our favorites.

Many experienced anglers contributed to this list, including our Hunt and Fish Editor Rachelle Schrutte and Aaron King — an experienced competitive sport fisherman based in California. The greater GearJunkie team has decades of collective experience on lakes, rivers, freshwater, and saltwater. Our testing process brought us to just about every teeming fishery under the sun — from Baja to Minnesota. Along the way, we assessed durability, shape and coverage, effectiveness, clarity, weight, and style.

While we did test some of the more popular models from major brands such as Maui Jim, Oakley, and Smith, we also checked out options from smaller more fishing-specific manufacturers.

As new fishing sunglasses hit the market, we’ll be sure to get our hands on them to ensure that our list includes the best of the best at any given time. And, if you’re interested in sunglasses for other outdoor adventures, check out our guide to the Best Sunglasses for the Outdoors and the Best Sunglasses for Women.

Buyer’s Guide: How to Choose Fishing Sunglasses

A glorious afternoon of glassy water and golden sunshine; (photo/Rachelle Schrute)

When shopping for fishing sunglasses, it’s important to consider your budget, style, activity, location, and personal comfort. This is easier said than done. Let’s break down a few of these key factors.

Fishing Disciplines

There are so many wonderful ways to fish. Some folks do it for work, others do it for fun, and some combine the two as professional sport fishermen. There are dozens of subdisciplines out there, but perhaps the most important distinction is freshwater vs. saltwater.

Freshwater

Freshwater fisheries include lakes, rivers, and ponds. Freshwater fishing is generally associated with tame water, fairly shallow water, and shady vegetated banks. Wide open lakes and reservoirs often come with sunny conditions and lots of surface glare. In such environments, a lens like the Costa King Tides that has side shields and offers a lot of protection will come in handy.

When fishing shallow water, a high-contrast lens can help identify movement while sight-fishing. We’re strong proponents of finding a single versatile pair of glasses like the Smith Guide’s Choice that can handle all of your fishing needs. Still, every day is a little different when fishing freshwater, and it’s wise to own a few pairs that you can switch in and out of depending on the day’s conditions.

Saltwater

A good pair of sunglasses might increase your odds of enjoying moments like this; (photo/Rachelle Schrute)

Saltwater fishing means large waves, big swell, huge fish, possible storms, and relentless sun. Again, every fishery is different but it’s safe to assume that you’ll be out on the water with the sun beating down and reflecting all over the surface of the water.

If that’s the case, you’ll want a pair of those very bright lenses to protect your eyes while you’re out chasing your desired species. For these instances, give the Wiley X P-17 or the Fin-Nor Tilloo a shot. Getting familiar with common weather patterns in your fisheries can also be helpful when shopping for glasses.

Saltwater is hard on gear, and sunglasses are no exception. If you want your sunnies to last in marine environments, we recommend seeking out a durable pair and treating them to frequent freshwater rinses. And, if you’re considering a trip to the tropics, check out our complete guide to gear you need to bring.

Lens Types and Materials

Lenses are the most important component of sunglasses. There are endless different lenses on the market, and each offers slightly different features and characteristics. Recent technological advancements in optics, as we see in the Bajio Vega, have been incredible and the standards for lens quality have never been higher.

With that said, there are plenty of sub-par lenses on the market. Quality is number one, but it’s also crucial to pick a lens that matches the weather conditions and water depth where you’ll be fishing.

Lens Color

All smiles with a quality pair of mirrored lenses; (photo/Rachelle Schrute)

We anglers consider color when selecting our lures and flies. We want to do the same when it comes to our lenses. Our eyes are powerful, adaptable, and delicate — but most of all they are unique. Every person has a different experience of light and color. We can’t say for certain what will work for you, but we can give you an idea of what works for most folks. It will be up to you to do some trial and error. 

If you’re heading out to a local lake during a bluebird day and won’t be doing much shallow-water fishing, you’ll likely want to grab some blue or green mirror lenses. If you’re going out to fly fish on a free-flowing river, we’d recommend a high-contrast lens like copper or copper-silver. Try some low-light rose or silver lenses for evening fishing and good topwater bite.

Owning a different pair of sunglasses for every kind of weather isn’t feasible for everyone. We recommend that you first start with a pair of “do-it-all’’ glasses and branch out from there. Most of the frames that we mentioned in this article can be matched up with a green mirror lens to form a versatile workhorse. Many brands offer free exchange options — especially if purchased through retailers or distributors.

Lens Material

The other key lens consideration is material. Most frames nowadays offer both polycarbonate and glass lens options, such as seen on the Costa Del Mar Lido. Don’t be fooled by these simple terms — most modern lenses aren’t made of a single solid material. Instead, lenses often consist of 10 or more layers of different hair-thin materials and treatments including hydrophobic coatings, anti-reflective coatings, and anti-scratch protection. Due to these variables, we can’t strictly say that glass or polycarbonate is always better.

Glass lenses are known for supreme scratch resistance due to their inherent hardness. It’s also said that glass lenses can offer better optical clarity. Typically, glass lenses also make for a heavier pair of glasses.

Polycarbonate lenses are a great choice if weight savings are a priority for you. Every brand has a bit of its own variation when it comes to the lens materials that it offers. Like with color, we encourage buyers to compare specific lenses to each other rather than broad categories like glass and polycarbonate.

Fit

Ideally, fishing sunglasses are comfortable enough to wear all day long. Comfort is a direct result of fit. Finding the right fit for you takes time, but it’s a worthwhile process. Don’t compromise on this.

On the practical side, the right fit helps prevent sunlight from sneaking in from the sides, maximizing your eye protection. Features like adjustable nose pads and temple tips help provide a snug yet comfortable grip.

Many fishing sunglasses like the Bajio Stiltsville have large frames to maximize coverage and protection. This works well for those with large faces, but it can be an issue for everyone else. Refer to our comparison to get a better sense of the fit of all of our recommended glasses.

Durability

GearJunkie’s Hunt and Fish Editor Rachelle Schrute stoked on a fresh catch; (photo/Rachelle Schrute)

Along with advancements in lens technology, there has been a notable shift toward innovative frame materials in recent years. Many of the brands highlighted on this list have moved beyond conventional steel, aluminum, or other metal frames. Instead, leading brands have embraced alternative materials that offer performance enhancements and/or environmental benefits.

Current trends lean toward frames crafted from robust and heat-resistant nylon or acetate-based materials. Furthermore, there’s now a strong emphasis on sustainability. Many frames utilize biodegradable plastics or recycled plastics retrieved from our oceans, reducing the environmental impact in case a pair goes missing in the great outdoors.

Durability is a huge concern when it comes to small hardware and added features like nose pads and temple pads. When we fish, we put our gear through the wringer. We want glasses that don’t fall apart after a single season. We’re confident in the durability of the sunglasses on this list, but to best protect your investment, look for a pair of sunglasses with a decent warranty.

Bonus Tip

Buy Croakies. And if you don’t know what Croakies are, they’re corded keepers for your glasses. If you take a digger and end up face down in the river, they’ll keep your glasses from leaving your body. Some of them float, which is a bonus if you’re fishing deep water.

Seriously, buy them. You won’t regret it.

Don’t hit the water without a good pair of sunnies; (photo/Rachelle Schrute)

FAQ

How do polarized lenses work?

Polarized lenses absorb horizontal light. Because the light source is coming from above and typically reflecting from a flat surface below, the majority of glare is horizontal light.

By removing that incoming light with a polarized lens, you’re left with only vertical light. The result is the ability to look through the surface of the water with far less reflecting light interfering with your view.

Think of it as being able to utilize the ambient light under the water without a light shining down on it and flashing back into your eyes

The increased visibility makes sight fishing possible, even in bright conditions. It allows you to see underwater landscape features you may have otherwise not known were there.

What color lens is best?

When choosing a lens color, it’s essential to understand which colors work best in which scenarios. Costa does a great job explaining the best lens color for your activity.

Each manufacturer will have slightly different recommendations based on the colors/finishes they offer.

Adding a mirror finish to any color lens will help reflect even more light, giving you increased visibility in bright situations.

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